PDA

View Full Version : O/T Squash



CAMiller
14-11-2015, 08:09 PM
No, not what SE does to anything he sits on but the racquet sport. The World Championships are being held here in the Seattle area this week but I must admit I'd almost forgotten about the sport since the heydays of Jahangir Khan and Jonah Barrington and dabbling in it myself a short while in the late 80s early 90s.

Is it still popular over there? There is a bubble of interest around here fueled probably by the Khan family's involvement in the sports clubs used by Microsoft employees. Doesn't seem to be much money in it as total prize money is just $325K although tickets are $100-$250 per day ($2,500 for the whole competition) and not surprisingly are not selling well.

Elite_Pie
14-11-2015, 10:15 PM
Hope you don't mind an outsider butting in, but I'll offer an opinion. Squash is in decline over here and has been for a while. There was a bit of a boom in the 80s and 90s, but the rise of the gym has got rid of many squash courts. Leisure centres realised that a couple of squash courts will attract four paying customers, knock them into a gym and you'll get 20 people handing over their cash. On top of that, it's not a sport that televises well due to the small ball at high speed being very hard to spot. I love it, I've been playing for over 40 years and still manage a couple of games a week in retirement. You don't see many youngsters involved nowadays so I think it will remain a minority sport.

CAMiller
14-11-2015, 10:20 PM
Don't mind at all Elite, your posts on here are always welcome. Having been away now for the best part of two decades that is just what I was thinking with regards it's fall in popularity.

mikemiller
14-11-2015, 10:52 PM
It was definitely popular mid 70s through the 80s, in my experience, mainly with middle-class types who were not interested in football Several of the people who I knew who played squash were soon racking up a list of elbow, knee and eye injuries, so didn't continue for long.

I've watched it on telly...its a bit boring.

Brin
14-11-2015, 10:59 PM
Love the orange but not keen on the grapefruit flavour.....

sota
15-11-2015, 01:48 AM
I used to love squash. The courts at Herringthorpe Leisure Centre used to get booked solid. I was half decent but some of the players in the squash league were brilliant and had me running about like a lunatic lol. Back then squash was played at lunch time by many office workers who referred to it as heart attack hour lol

CAM, raquetball is very popular around here, but it's not as good as squash in my opinion.

CAMiller
15-11-2015, 04:54 AM
Likewise Sota - place I worked in Milton Keynes only had about 50 employees but around 25 of them played in a lunchtime squash ladder. Raquetball is also popular here but apparently the local Pro Sports club has 9 squash courts where the preliminary rounds will be played before the tournament moves to the convention centre.

sota
15-11-2015, 05:08 AM
Squash ladder, I haven't heard that for years lol :-)

vespabri
15-11-2015, 08:37 AM
Always prefered playing Badminton tbh guys..or Tennis.
Remember my squash playing cousin taking me on at squash at herringthorpe..he stood in middle of the court and moved about a ft.
I on the other hand was all over the place chasing lost causes..banging my head against the walls lol.
As for other sports i do miss playing Snooker..loed playing that.

Elite_Pie
15-11-2015, 06:36 PM
CAM, raquetball is very popular around here, but it's not as good as squash in my opinion.

I always used to look down on racketball as a bit of a kids and womens game until I started playing it. Joined a squash club, and in winter the early bookings were played on a bloody freezing cold court. The squash ball was like a lump of lead and never got warm. A few people told us to give racketball a try instead, and I soon began to enjoy it more than squash. Longer rallies and a bit more precision needed to hit a winner.

kempo
15-11-2015, 07:07 PM
Squash was indeed popular in the 70 s and 80 s but it killed off all the young people who had HOCM and all the middle aged players who died from cardiac failure.

There were a few hardcore remaining but most of these became blind in one eye from a detached retina or bleeding into the anterior chamber.

This left 1500 players worldwide and 25 per cent of these were disabled by repeated racket injuries to the back of the head.

CAMiller
15-11-2015, 11:25 PM
So not a fan then Kempo? Apart from the ball related injuries surely natural selection would have weeded out the others as they would have chosen other racquet sports or other pastimes that are equally as strenuous on the heart. Unless you think they would have resorted to tiddly winks?

kempo
16-11-2015, 08:15 AM
Loved squash when I was at university, Grest sport but is well known for selecting out people with unknown heart problems..as you say Darwinism at its best.

I love the fact that you always get a key to the court to play anytime at any squash club in the country...quaint!

kempo
16-11-2015, 08:15 AM

Elite_Pie
16-11-2015, 04:43 PM
There were a few hardcore remaining but most of these became blind in one eye from a detached retina or bleeding into the anterior chamber.

This left 1500 players worldwide and 25 per cent of these were disabled by repeated racket injuries to the back of the head.

Conclusive proof that only 25% of statistics are genuine. The other 80% are made up.

CTMilller
17-11-2015, 02:58 AM
It's still popular in Asia and in India and Pakistan. I'm still a member of the club I used to go to in Singapore and they are very active with six singles courts and two doubles. Many of the local Chinese and Indians play as well as European expatriates. The squash ladder is very active and there are regular competitions with other local and overseas clubs and institutions I think it is beginning to struggle with an aging population of players but with space at a premium it's still an attractive option for those who want the challenge of a competition (as opposed to running on a treadmill and lifting weights to get fit.)