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Altobelli
22-12-2016, 10:34 AM
GENUFLECT verb (jen-yoo-flekt)

(1)To bend the knee or touch one knee to the floor in reverence or worship.

(2)To express a servile attitude

Right now TEC is sending out PM's to everyone asking them to be # 2 with him http://i65.tinypic.com/xb03mu.jpg

The Bedlington Terrier
22-12-2016, 02:23 PM
GENUFLECT verb (jen-yoo-flekt)

(1)To bend the knee or touch one knee to the floor in reverence or worship.

(2)To express a servile attitude

Right now TEC is sending out PM's to everyone asking them to be # 2 with him http://i65.tinypic.com/xb03mu.jpg

No he is not! Everyone on here knows who is in charge and he's a crazed bus driver from "down south"! :confused:

Altobelli
22-12-2016, 04:20 PM
No he is not! Everyone on here knows who is in charge and he's a crazed bus driver from "down south"! :confused:


You need to be crazy to do my job down here, but in charge here ? I have and would never have the acumen to do so.

Altobelli
23-12-2016, 03:25 PM
TANNENBAUM verb (tah-nuh-n-boum)

(1)A Christmas Tree.

The Bedlington Terrier
23-12-2016, 04:43 PM
It's just a tree!

2698

Turfmoorspirit
23-12-2016, 05:08 PM
Goober !

alfinyalcabo
23-12-2016, 05:10 PM
W@NKER Verb wan ker

A moderator of a football forum.

Altobelli
23-12-2016, 05:15 PM
W@NKER Verb wan ker

A moderator of a football forum.

http://i64.tinypic.com/ezefk0.jpg

Altobelli
24-12-2016, 02:20 PM
WASSAIL verb (wos_uhl,was_,wo_setl)

(1)To drink to the health or success of; toast.

(2)To revel with drinking.

noun
(1)a saltation wishing health to a person, used in England in early times when presenting a cup of drink or when drinking to the person.

(2)a festivity or revel with drinking of healths.

(3)liquor for drinking and wishing health to others on festive occasions, especially spiced ale, as on Christmas Eve and Twelfth night.

Altobelli
25-12-2016, 09:35 PM
JOLLIFICATION nown jol_uh_fi_key_shuh n

Jolly merrymaking; jolly festivity.

Altobelli
26-12-2016, 12:42 PM
TZEDAKAH noun (tsuh-ah-kah; tsuh-daw-kuh)

Noun
Hebrew, charity or the giving of charity.

outwoodclaret
26-12-2016, 12:57 PM
Although not really in the Christmas spirit the word schadenfreude springs into mind though I only really wish it for those who have already done the dirty on others. Especially if they thought they would get away with it!

Altobelli
26-12-2016, 01:09 PM
Good word that outwood, are you ont Turf today ?

outwoodclaret
26-12-2016, 03:18 PM
Good word that outwood, are you ont Turf today ?

No. I am at home in Radcliffe with my iPad and a not too joyous wife. I can only get to games now when my beautiful granddaughters shove me in a car and drive me there. I wish we could have a Turfites Talk meet up sometime but what venue?

Altobelli
26-12-2016, 04:03 PM
Yes a meet up would be good, preferably in the summer.

The Bedlington Terrier
26-12-2016, 06:19 PM
The Brun Lea on Manchester Road is a good spot, beer is cheap, food not bad and you can keep adding tables when extra guests arrive!

Altobelli
28-12-2016, 05:38 PM
DE RIGUEUR adjective (duh-ri-gur)

adjective

(1) Strictly requiered, as by etiquette, usage, or fashion.

Norder
28-12-2016, 05:49 PM
DE RIGUEUR adjective (duh-ri-gur)


Vexatious canker of a word/saying.... especially when spoken with a curled lip and raised eyebrows.

:mad:

..

:)

Altobelli
28-12-2016, 06:01 PM
SOCKEROO noun (Sok-uh-roo)

noun

(1) Slang. a notable success: Her performance was a sockeroo.

sinkov
28-12-2016, 10:47 PM
JOLLIFICATION nown jol_uh_fi_key_shuh n

Jolly merrymaking; jolly festivity.

Is it possible to have merrymaking that's not jolly ?

I only ask.

oldcolner
28-12-2016, 11:12 PM
ENMESHMENT

used by a girl who was reported missing by her parents for not turning up for Xmas meal.

Means people get so intertwined they stop personal development - so it's all her mums fault.

Sounds like a good film title.

alfinyalcabo
28-12-2016, 11:28 PM
Winnit /WINNET....1) sh(t that sticks to your arse hair. As mentioned in Viz. The same as a cling on, tag nut, dangle berry.2) Blackburn Rovers supporter that continually moans about their rightful position ..

2746

The Bedlington Terrier
29-12-2016, 04:18 AM
Is it possible to have merrymaking that's not jolly ?

I only ask.

We had the grandkids over for Christmas and they were merrymaking jellies with the wife, so I suppose it is possible although they did seem to have a jolly good time! :D

sinkov
29-12-2016, 09:57 AM
Winnit /WINNET....1) sh(t that sticks to your arse hair. As mentioned in Viz. The same as a cling on, tag nut, dangle berry.2) Blackburn Rovers supporter that continually moans about their rightful position ..

2746

That brings back memories Alf, I have a copy of that Clag-Gone ad from Viz in the back of a drawer somewhere. I couldn't stop laughing when I first saw it, must be 20 years ago now.

"Leaves your gusset lemon fresh".........brilliant.

The Bedlington Terrier
29-12-2016, 12:55 PM
There are some belters out there...

2748

oldcolner
29-12-2016, 12:59 PM
That's a cracker!

sinkov
29-12-2016, 03:48 PM
There are some belters out there...

2748

That reminds of the old, blind vicar on a steam train many years ago, Two girls got into the compartment with him and after a while decided to have a bit of fun. One of them lifted her skirt, pulled her knickers down and flashed her waz at him. "Ah" said the old vicar "Grimsby, this is where I get off".

Altobelli
29-12-2016, 04:12 PM
"freshen up your flaps and stop it stinking like an old kipper" http://i45.tinypic.com/4v25qv.jpg

Where was Mary Whitehouse when that ad went out ?

Altobelli
29-12-2016, 04:21 PM
LUNATION noun (loo-ney-shuh n)

noun

(1)The period of time from one new moon to the next (about 29 and a half days); a lunar month.

The Bedlington Terrier
29-12-2016, 04:23 PM
"freshen up your flaps and stop it stinking like an old kipper" http://i45.tinypic.com/4v25qv.jpg

Where was Mary Whitehouse when that ad went out ?

Gone AWOL obviously Alto!:?

alfinyalcabo
29-12-2016, 05:43 PM
senile
ˈsiːnʌɪl/
adjective
(of a person) 1) Moderators who run this board having or showing the weaknesses or diseases of old age, especially a loss of mental faculties.
"The matron couldn't cope with her senile husband" .. "TEC drools into his porridge every morning"
synonyms: doddering, doddery, decrepit, aged, long in the tooth, senescent, failing, declining, infirm, feeble, unsteady, in one's dotage, losing one's faculties, in one's second childhood, mentally confused, suffering from Alzheimer's (disease), suffering from senile dementia; More
(of a condition) characteristic of or caused by old age.
"senile decay"
Feedback

:D B)

Altobelli
29-12-2016, 07:09 PM
At least me and TEC can still P!ss in a toilet, admittedly TEC misses 9 times out of 10 http://i58.tinypic.com/scdzbc.jpg

The Bedlington Terrier
29-12-2016, 07:55 PM
At least me and TEC can still P!ss in a toilet, admittedly TEC misses 9 times out of 10 http://i58.tinypic.com/scdzbc.jpg

The wife says I have to sit now Alto, even to have a pee!

Altobelli
30-12-2016, 04:55 PM
The wife says I have to sit now Alto, even to have a pee!

That's fine TEC, when the time comes for someone to have to help me and wipe me harris, that's the time I'll tell them to use a pillow over my face.

Altobelli
30-12-2016, 05:41 PM
SENECTITUDE noun (si-nek-ti-tood, -tyood)

noun

(1) The last stage of life, old age.

The Bedlington Terrier
30-12-2016, 05:44 PM
That's fine TEC, when the time comes for someone to have to help me and wipe me harris, that's the time I'll tell them to use a pillow over my face.

Just ring me when you are ready pal? :D

Altobelli
30-12-2016, 05:52 PM
Just ring me when you are ready pal? :D

http://i65.tinypic.com/xb03mu.jpg

You'll have to get to the back of the Queue TEC.

The Bedlington Terrier
30-12-2016, 10:08 PM
Lol!

Acido
30-12-2016, 10:12 PM
Your having a go at the mods a fair bit tonight Alfredo, doesnt your zimmer frame get in the way of all that ugliness ? XD

And Alto, heres a rare word for you all today .... Tautology (tort-o-logy)!

The Bedlington Terrier
30-12-2016, 10:21 PM
I have been asked by the powers that be why don't we have mods who moderate?

I replied we are too busy falling out with each other over Andre Gray, Mike Garlick, the virtues of prudency etc.etc. :D

Plus we have the best posters on the Footymad network.

Thanks everyone and have a fandabidozi 2017. :D

Supersub6
30-12-2016, 10:41 PM
I have been asked by the powers that be why don't we have mods who moderate?

I replied we are too busy falling out with each other over Andre Gray, Mike Garlick, the virtues of prudency etc.etc. :D

Plus we have the best posters on the Footymad network.

Thanks everyone and have a fandabidozi 2017. :D

Thank you wee Jimmy -- and you try to tell is that you are edificated ;D

Altobelli
31-12-2016, 11:09 AM
TOODLE-00 interjection tood-l-oo)

interjection

(1) Informal. goodbye; so long.

Quotes

All right. Well, toodle-oo. I'm off to find Stinker.
-- P. G. Wodehouse, The Code of the Woosters, 1938

Have you charted that journey, or is the best you can say, "Toodle-oo! We don't know where we are going, but we're on our way!"
-- "Hiking with Green Bar Bill," Boys' Life, January 1946

Origin

The origin of toodle-oo is unclear. It may be from toodle, a variant of tootle, which means "to walk unsteadily, like a toddler." It may also be from tootle, which means “to toot gently (on a flute); to move slowly or leisurely.” Finally, the word may be imitative of the toot of an (early) automobile horn or klaxon. None of the three possibilities satisfactorily accounts for the -oo element. The word appeared in English in the early 1900s.

The Bedlington Terrier
31-12-2016, 08:46 PM
Gloat.

Alto, that's my word for today.

Ole, Ole, Ole, Ole, Andre, Ole!:D

Altobelli
31-12-2016, 09:04 PM
One swallow and all that TEC...........

The Bedlington Terrier
01-01-2017, 01:22 PM
One swallow and all that TEC...........

Don't swallow too hard Alto...

Altobelli
01-01-2017, 06:02 PM
HANDSEL noun (han-suh l)

noun

(1)A Gift or token for good luck or as an expression of good wishes, as at the beginning of the new year or when entering upon a new situation or enterprise.

(2)A first instalment of payment.

Altobelli
02-01-2017, 12:38 PM
YEASAYER noun (yey-sey-er)

noun

(1) A person with an optimistic and confident outlook.

(2)A person who habitually agrees with or is submissive to others.

alfinyalcabo
02-01-2017, 12:45 PM
NAYSAYER

noun. 1. a person who habitually expresses negative or pessimistic views: Despite a general feeling that things were going well, a few naysayers tried to cast doom and gloom.

Altobelli
02-01-2017, 01:31 PM
I walked straight into that didn't I alf http://i63.tinypic.com/2eoadzb.jpg

And I could ask for a better poster giving it to me B)

Acido
02-01-2017, 07:58 PM
I have been asked by the powers that be why don't we have mods who moderate?

Mods who moderate eh, now theres a novel idea. Whos going to be the first to try that ? :D

alfinyalcabo
02-01-2017, 08:20 PM
I walked straight into that didn't I alf http://i63.tinypic.com/2eoadzb.jpg

And I couldn't ask for a better poster giving it to me B)

I'm the best there is Alto.. I never get wound up.. ;D

The Bedlington Terrier
02-01-2017, 09:16 PM
Mods who moderate eh, now theres a novel idea. Whos going to be the first to try that ? :D

No-one I know! O:)

alfinyalcabo
02-01-2017, 10:06 PM
A good board mods itself..that's what's we have here..a good bunch of posters ..even a Ghost.lol

Altobelli
07-01-2017, 05:07 PM
MURMURATION noun (mur-muh-rey-shuh n)

noun

(1) A flock of Starlings.

(2)An act or instance of murmuring.

-------- - --------------- -- - --- - -- - - -- - -

EMOLUMENT noun (ih-mol-yuh-muy nt0

noun

(1)Profit, salary. or fees from office or employment; compensation for services: Tips are an emolument in addition to wages.

------- - - -------- - -- --- - -- - ---- ---- - - ---- -- -- -

DRACONIAN adjective (drey-koh-nee-uh n, druh)

adjective

(1) rigorous, unusually severe or cruel: Draconian forms of punishment.

Altobelli
07-01-2017, 05:08 PM
ETIOLATE verb (ee-tee-uh-leyt)

verb

(1) to cause to become weakened or sickly; drain of colour or vigor.

(2)to cause (a plant) to whiten or grow pale by excluding light: to etiolate celery.

(3) (Of Plants) to whiten or grow pale through lack of light.


----_---------- -- - - - - - -- - - -- - - -- - - - -- - - - -- - - -- - -- - --

FRONDESCENCE noun (fron-des-uh ns)

(1)Leafage; foliage.

(2) The process of period of putting forth leaves, as a tree, plant, or the like.

Altobelli
08-01-2017, 10:26 PM
FALLAL noun (fal-lal)

noun

(1) A bit of finery; a showy article of dress.

oldcolner
08-01-2017, 10:41 PM
Recidivist - convicted criminal who keeps reoffending.

Stonking - very large or impressive

sinkov
08-01-2017, 11:40 PM
BLOWHARD noun

A person who likes to talk about how important they are.

Remind you of anyone ?

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 08:06 AM
BLOWHARD noun

A person who likes to talk about how important they are.

Remind you of anyone ?

Alto, don't stand for this sort of hurtful innuendo mate? :p

sinkov
09-01-2017, 09:37 AM
I certainly wasn't thinking of anyone on this msgboard.

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 10:05 AM
I certainly wasn't thinking of anyone on this msgboard.

We all knew who you meant sinkov! :D

Altobelli
09-01-2017, 11:18 AM
BLOWHARD noun

A person who likes to talk about how important they are.

Remind you of anyone ?





Alto, don't stand for this sort of hurtful innuendo mate? :p

http://i64.tinypic.com/ezefk0.jpg

I knew straight away who Sinkov meant, I even thought it myself as I typed.

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 12:45 PM
You have to laugh..! :D

alfinyalcabo
09-01-2017, 02:33 PM
CAUSTIC

adjective

Severely critical or sarcastic

Example: The old geriatric poster made a caustic remark when he was abused by the moderators..

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 03:01 PM
"The old geriatric poster"

We try to leave you alone best we can Alf! XD

sinkov
09-01-2017, 03:16 PM
We all knew who you meant sinkov! :D

You might think that Tec, I couldn't possibly comment.

sinkov
09-01-2017, 03:18 PM
Posted twice, ignore this.

Altobelli
09-01-2017, 03:25 PM
Posted twice, ignore this.

Sorry cannot ignore you Sinkov, as TEC says its alf we try and side step ;D

Altobelli
09-01-2017, 03:40 PM
CREPITATE verb (krep-i-teyt)

verb

(1) To make a crackling sound;crackle.

Quotes:

Kate could hardly remember now the dry rigid pallor of the heat, when the whole earth seemed to crepitate viciously with dry malevolence; like memory gone dry and sterile, hellish.
-D.H. Lawrence, The Plumed Serpent, 1926.

sinkov
09-01-2017, 03:41 PM
Sorry cannot ignore you Sinkov,

Don't see why not Alto, the missus does.

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 04:11 PM
Don't see why not Alto, the missus does.

Not surprised sinkov when your idea of a good night out is a Friday night youth game, followed by a visit to the chippy that is already closed.

Hey Big Spender..! :D

sinkov
09-01-2017, 04:15 PM
Not surprised sinkov when your idea of a good night out is a Friday night youth game, followed by a visit to the chippy that is already closed.

Hey Big Spender..! :D

Be fair Tec, you must have read the follow-up post where I told you I took her to the Kettledrum first. Proper gent me !!

And I'm making her tea tonight.

The Bedlington Terrier
09-01-2017, 05:23 PM
Be fair Tec, you must have read the follow-up post where I told you I took her to the Kettledrum first. Proper gent me !!

And I'm making her tea tonight.

You are all heart sinkov!

sinkov
09-01-2017, 08:50 PM
I'm not going to argue with you.;D

Balanbam00
10-01-2017, 07:45 AM
Not the same but ......

The Quotes of Steven Wright:
1 - I'd kill for a Nobel Peace Prize.
2 - Borrow money from pessimists -- they don't expect it back.
3 - Half the people you know are below average.
4 - 99% of lawyers give the rest a bad name.
5 - 82.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
6 - A conscience is what hurts when all your other parts feel so good.
7 - A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
8 - If you want the rainbow, you got to put up with the rain.
9 - All those who believe in psycho kinesis, raise my hand.
10 - The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
11 - I almost had a psychic girlfriend, ..... But she left me before we met.
12 - OK, so what's the speed of dark?
13 - How do you tell when you're out of invisible ink?
14 - If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.
15 - Depression is merely anger without enthusiasm.
16 - When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane.
17 - Ambition is a poor excuse for not having enough sense to be lazy.

Altobelli
10-01-2017, 05:20 PM
FLACKERY noun (flak-uh-ree)

noun

(1) Publicity and promotion; press agentry.

Quotes

For the past 30 years, Stanley Kubrick has been the movies' most artful spin doctor pointedly shunning traditional Hollywood flackery, but always taking care that the whole world is clued in to his "legendary" integrity and perfectionism.
-John Powers, "Moscow Should Believe in Tears," New York, January 24th, 1994.

Origin:

Flackery comes from flack, a word said to be derived from the name of a famous movie publicity agent, Gene Flack. Flack has been used in English since the 1930's.

The Bedlington Terrier
10-01-2017, 08:12 PM
Like Daz Bentley you mean Alto?

He's a proper flackerer! :p

Altobelli
11-01-2017, 03:01 PM
I know he's the # 1 mouthpiece for BFC, but there is just something I don't like about him and I cannot put my finger on it.

Altobelli
11-01-2017, 03:38 PM
MYRMIDON noun (mur-mi-don,-dn)

noun

(1) A person who executes without question or scruple a master's commands.

(2) Classical Mythology. (initial capital letter) one of the warlike people of ancient Thessaly who accompanied Achilles to the Trojan War.

Quotes:

You order me to do that; you order me to do everything; but the time's past when I obeyed you like a Myrmidon.
Booth Tarkington, Women 1925.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
11-01-2017, 04:30 PM
Kakorrhaphiophobia Noun

the fear of failure or defeat. We all suffer this one on here !!

The Bedlington Terrier
11-01-2017, 05:24 PM
Kakorrhaphiophobia Noun

the fear of failure or defeat. We all suffer this one on here !!

Is that where, "I'm going to kak my pants" originates from? :O

Altobelli
11-01-2017, 05:39 PM
KAK

South Africanism for Sh!t Pronounced: KUK


Excuse me while I go take a kak.
You speak more kak than Goerge Bush.
Kak in your eye poes!

From The Urban Dictionary.

Altobelli
12-01-2017, 06:56 PM
WILLOWWACKS noun (wil-oh-waks)

noun

(1) New England. a wooded, uninhabited area.

Quote:

They couldn't believe anyone could just walk out of the willowwacks, Navy Seal or not.
Aaron Gwyn, Wynne's War, 2014.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
13-01-2017, 08:50 AM
GABELLE noun

- A tax on salt.

The Bedlington Terrier
13-01-2017, 09:16 AM
GABELLE noun

- A tax on salt.

Well, they tax just about everything else..!

Altobelli
13-01-2017, 05:42 PM
CRAMBO noun (kram-boh)

noun

(1) Inferior rhyme.

(2)A game in which one person or side must find a rhyme to a word or a line of verse given by another.

Quote:
"Then your worship understands crambo?" said the squire. "Better than you imagine, answered the knight, as you will see when you carry from me a letter to my mistress Dulcinea del Toboso, written in verse from top to bottom.
Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616), The Adventures of Don Quixote, translated by Tobias Smollett, 1755.

The Bedlington Terrier
13-01-2017, 08:31 PM
I was on the London Tube on Wednesday going from Euston to Oxford Circus, my gosh they know how to CRAMBO them in those carriages!

Altobelli
13-01-2017, 09:25 PM
I was on the London Tube on Wednesday going from Euston to Oxford Circus, my gosh they know how to CRAMBO them in those carriages!

I'd forgotten how busy the Tube and trains were TEC.

I had to go to Blackfriars last Wednesday and Thursday on a course, got the train, going in at 6:30 in the morning was a doddle, coming home from Blackfriars at tea time was murder, all 8 carriages full, so I pretended to be a Southerner and barged my way in.

Altobelli
14-01-2017, 07:04 PM
LATERIGRADE adjective (lat-er-i-greyd)

adjective

(1) Having a sideways manner of moving, as a crab.

Quotes:
Not with the blunt and clumsy directness here set forth, but with concealed approach, with laterigrade advance and retrogression, and with antennal deftness as of an emmet feeling its way in the midst of supposed enemies.
Henry Christopher McCook, The Latimers: A Tale of the Western Insurrection of 1794, 1897.

Altobelli
15-01-2017, 06:18 PM
IGNEOUS adjective (ig-nee-uh s)

adjective

(1) Of, relating to, or characteristic of fire.
(2)Geology. produced under conditions involving intense heat, as rocks of volcanic origin or rocks crystallized from molten magma.

Quote:

In the distance, an igneous flash spread silently through the clouds, flaring in great yellow pools, lighting the desert floor and the cactus and mesquite and the greenery that was trying to bloom along a riverbed that never held water exept during the monsoon season.
James Lee Burke, Feast Day of Fools, 2011.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
16-01-2017, 08:57 AM
BIBBLE Verb

– to drink often; to eat and/or drink noisily.

The Bedlington Terrier
16-01-2017, 10:04 AM
BIBBLE Verb

– to drink often; to eat and/or drink noisily.

Describes Alf to a tee! Alfie Bibble!

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 03:16 PM
Describes Alf to a tee! Alfie Bibble!

http://img1.imagehousing.com/0/mjmnbgvfdcf-601792.gif (http://www.imagehousing.com/image/mjmnbgvfdcf/1290454)

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 03:55 PM
After looking in several Books and more importantly asking the adjudicator (Matron), Bibble is not a word.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
16-01-2017, 04:33 PM
After looking in several Books and more importantly asking the adjudicator (Matron), Bibble is not a word.

This is where i found it !!

https://voxy.com/blog/index.php/2011/03/weird-english-words-from-a-to-z/

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 04:49 PM
That's a good word (Bibble), and seems a good web site you have put up Server, but its the only one that quotes the word in that meaning, not saying its wrong Server but I have looked on the internet, App Dictionary and a Collins Reference plus asked know all wife, even the urban dictionary does not quote it, be interesting to see it elsewhere.

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 05:21 PM
RECTITUDE noun (rek-ti-tood,-tyood)

noun

(1) Rightness of principle or conduct; moral virtue: the rectitude of her motives.

(2) Correctness: rectitude of judgment.

(3) Straightness.

Quote:

Nonviolence, as a strategy, hinges on faith: it is faith in the ultimate moral rectitude and the perfectibility of systems of power.
Charles M. Blow, "Violence in Baltimore," New York Times, April 29, 2015.

alfinyalcabo
16-01-2017, 05:29 PM
BEDGASM

according to the urban dictionary is: A feeling of complete and utter euphoria which peaks when climbing into bed at the end of an 18-hour workday, a long road trip or hours of extremely strenuous WORK

E.G. "After a hard shift on the buses Alto arrived home and enjoyed a bedgasm"

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 05:40 PM
At the most (and not always) a 14 hour day alf, just finished a stint, I have Tuesday/Wednesday off then a straight 7 days before my next rest days, the slog is going to bed early and not being able to sleep and having to get my carcase up at 3am which is killing me.

alfinyalcabo
16-01-2017, 06:17 PM
At the most (and not always) a 14 hour day alf, just finished a stint, I have Tuesday/Wednesday off then a straight 7 days before my next rest days, the slog is going to bed early and not being able to sleep and having to get my carcase up at 3am which is killing me.

FFS Alto,use your Noggin...Go onthe sick then retire at Easter..you know it makes sense ..Don't forget you are only a number to them and you owe them nothing ..

Altobelli
16-01-2017, 07:27 PM
FFS Alto,use your Noggin...Go onthe sick then retire at Easter..you know it makes sense ..Don't forget you are only a number to them and you owe them nothing ..

Was all set to do just that alf, been going sick with a back problem that would not mean me losing my PSV Licence and them having to pay me off, then the union rep said he could get me doing the same job part time doing just 2 days a week, now our garage has just lost 4 routes ( our Management could not even run a bath) which means we are massively overstaffed so I may have to go back to my original plan.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
17-01-2017, 09:11 AM
Curmudgeon (kəːˈmʌdʒ(ə)n)

Are you trying to find just the right word for someone who’s very bad-tempered and grumpy? Curmudgeon (noun) might be just the word that you’re looking for!

Dating back to at least the 16th century, this word has been used for a long time.

If you hear someone say,

“I don’t like our English teacher … he is a real curmudgeon!”

you can agree (or hopefully disagree!) and know what it means.

Altobelli
17-01-2017, 03:16 PM
I didn't think you'd come up with a better word than Bibble, but Curmudgeon is another cracker Server B)

alfinyalcabo
17-01-2017, 03:37 PM
Syzygy
[siz-i-jee]

Amazingly, the only English word with three Ys also happens to describe a rare astronomical event involving three heavenly bodies. A syzygy is the alignment of three celestial bodies in a straight line, commonly the Earth, the Sun and the Moon. Now, what is the only common English word to end in -mt?

Altobelli
17-01-2017, 05:03 PM
Dreamt.

Altobelli
17-01-2017, 06:34 PM
JURISPRUDENCE noun (joo r-is-prood-ns,joo r-is-prood-)

noun

(1) The science or philosophy of law.
(2) A body or system of laws.
(3) A department of law: medical jurisprudence.
(4) Civil Law, decisions of courts, especially of reviewing tribunals.

Quote:

The science of jurisprudence regards the state and power as the ancients regarded fire-namely, as something existing absolutely. But for history, the state and power are merely phenomena, just as for modern physics fire is not an element but a phenomenon.
Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace, translated by Natham Haskell Dale, 1899.

alfinyalcabo
17-01-2017, 10:14 PM
Dreamt.

Yep,spot on Alto.. B)

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
18-01-2017, 09:11 AM
Logomachy

Noun - An argument about words:

Very apt word for this thread me thinks !!

The Bedlington Terrier
18-01-2017, 09:48 AM
Some really weird dudes post on here! :D

Altobelli
18-01-2017, 09:49 AM
Logomachy

Noun - An argument about words:

Very apt word for this thread me thinks !!

Now now Server, dont get Choleric http://i63.tinypic.com/2eoadzb.jpg http://i45.tinypic.com/11v5n4o.jpg

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
18-01-2017, 11:59 AM
Now now Server, dont get Choleric http://i63.tinypic.com/2eoadzb.jpg http://i45.tinypic.com/11v5n4o.jpg

Are you saying i may be a bit dyspeptic and querulous. I always thought of myself a bit of a blatherskite.:P

Altobelli
18-01-2017, 03:00 PM
You are no way a Blatherskite Server :)

The Bedlington Terrier
18-01-2017, 04:37 PM
Oh! Yes he is! :D

alfinyalcabo
18-01-2017, 07:19 PM
Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

[noo-muh-noh-uhl-truh-mahy-kruh-skop-ik-sil-i-koh-vol-key-noh-koh-nee-oh-sis, nyoo-]

noun

an obscure term ostensibly referring to a lung disease caused by silica dust, sometimes cited as one of the longest words in the English language.

Altobelli
18-01-2017, 07:27 PM
KATZENJAMMER noun (kat-suh n-jam-er)

noun

(1) Uneasiness; anguish, distress.
(2) The discomfort and illness experienced as the aftereffects of excessive drinking; hangover.
(3) Uproar; clamor: His speech produced a public katzenjammer.

Quote:

When a reporter really loves the craft, takes it seriously as I did, his life goes by the extremes of exaltarion and depression.. . .Life becomes a series of mental intoxications, for which one pays by mental katzenjammer.
-"The confessions of 'a Literary Journalist," The Bookman, Volume XXVI, December 1907.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
19-01-2017, 08:51 AM
Barmecide

Illusory or imaginary and therefore disappointing.

Altobelli
19-01-2017, 05:47 PM
ESPERANCE noun (es-per-uh ns)

noun

(1) Obsolete, hope.

Quote:

Teh lowest and most dejected thing of fortune, / Stands still in esperance, lives not in fear.
William Shakespeare, King Lear, 1608

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
20-01-2017, 01:25 PM
This ones for tomorrow really B)
Boilover

NOUN

Australian, NZ
informal
A surprise result, especially the defeat of a favorite in a sporting event.

Altobelli
20-01-2017, 04:49 PM
ASSEVERATE verb (uh-sev-uh-reyt)

verb

(1) To declare earnestly or solemnly; affirm positively; aver.

Quotes:

He asseverates that it was all a joke.
"Babblings," The Capital, Volume XI, June 9, 1900.

I asseverate that, during my occupation of Master B.'s room, I was taken by the ghost that haunted it, on expeditions fully as long and wild as any of those.
Charles Dickens, "The Haunted House," All the year Round, 1859.

The Bedlington Terrier
20-01-2017, 04:54 PM
I think you are both totally mad! (as in bonkers) :D

Altobelli
20-01-2017, 04:57 PM
I think you are both totally mad! (as in bonkers) :D

Its folk like us that make the world a better place..........

The Bedlington Terrier
21-01-2017, 03:43 AM
Agreed Alto. The world needs more genuine nutters, not faux ones like Trump and May!

Altobelli
21-01-2017, 07:52 PM
MULTITUDINOUS adjective (muhl-ti-tood-n-uh s,-tyood-)

adjective

(1) Existing, occurring, or present in great numbers; very numerous; forming a multitude or great number.

(2) Comprising many items, parts, or elements.

(3) Archaic, crowded or thronged.

Quotes:

It was only one phase of the multitudinous emotions which had assailed her.
Kate Chopin, The Awakening, 1899.

Altobelli
22-01-2017, 07:35 PM
TALISMAN noun (tal-is-muh n, -iz-)

noun
(1) Anything whose presence exercises a remarkable or powerful influence on human feelings or actions.
(2) A stone, ring, or other object, engraved with figures or characters supposed to possess occult powers and worn as an amulet or charm.
(3) Any amulet or charm.

The Bedlington Terrier
22-01-2017, 10:21 PM
Robbed.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
23-01-2017, 08:59 AM
This is what i felt like doing yesterday !!! ;D

Cacoethes

NOUN

An urge to do something inadvisable. O:)

The Bedlington Terrier
23-01-2017, 01:03 PM
I have an irresistible compulsion (cacoethes) to kill Jon Moss, he really is one useless phooker!

Good word that one SNR, never heard it before - ever! :confused:

Altobelli
23-01-2017, 07:57 PM
FROIDEUR noun (frwa-doer)


noun

(1) French, an attitude of haughty aloofness; cold superiority.

Quote:
How can I express the cruelty of the atmosphere, the impertinent froideur of the air, which bit at any exposed parts of our bodies in a manner reminiscent of the Empress's loathsome puppy.
John Boyne, The House of Special Purpose, 2009.

The Bedlington Terrier
23-01-2017, 08:07 PM
FROIDEUR noun (frwa-doer)


noun

(1) French, an attitude of haughty aloofness; cold superiority.

Quote:
How can I express the cruelty of the atmosphere, the impertinent froideur of the air, which bit at any exposed parts of our bodies in a manner reminiscent of the Empress's loathsome puppy.
John Boyne, The House of Special Purpose, 2009.

Wenger to a tee! :O

Altobelli
23-01-2017, 08:16 PM
Great minds think alike TEC http://i45.tinypic.com/11v5n4o.jpg

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
24-01-2017, 08:45 AM
Jon Moss did this at the Emirates !!

Absquatulate

VERB

Leave abruptly:

The Bedlington Terrier
24-01-2017, 09:04 AM
Jon Moss did this at the Emirates !!

Absquatulate

VERB

Leave abruptly:

No wonder! :(

Altobelli
24-01-2017, 06:10 PM
INTRAPRENEUR noun (in-truh-pruh-nur,-noo r, -nyoo r)

noun

(1) An employee of a large corporation who is given freedom and financial support to create new products, services, systems, etc., and does not have to follow the corporation's usual routines or protocols.

Quote:

Many companies- including global brands like IBM, eBay and Facebook- focus on developing an "intrapreneur" culture. An intrapreneur brings the creativity and drive often associated with startups to larger, established companies
Wes Gay, "Why Big Companies Should Act Small to Engage Millennials, Forbes, November 14, 2016.

The Bedlington Terrier
24-01-2017, 07:40 PM
Prevaricate.

Not handy with only seven days left in the window...

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
25-01-2017, 08:29 AM
Prevaricate.

Not handy with only seven days left in the window...

I think there will be a few on here with this if we don't buy anyone !!

Conniption

NOUN

A fit of rage or hysterics. O:)

Altobelli
25-01-2017, 08:45 PM
I think there will be a few on here with this if we don't buy anyone !!

Conniption

NOUN

A fit of rage or hysterics. O:)

There better be some new buys before the end of this window, no more lame excuses, they need to back the team.

Altobelli
25-01-2017, 09:58 PM
SIMPATICO adjective (sim-pah-ti-koh)


adjective


(1) Congenial or like-minded; likable: I find our new neighbor simpatico in every respect.


Quote:
When I got around to asking why she had bothered to track me down, she said it was because we were so simpatico.
Amor Towles, Rules of Civility, 2011.

The Bedlington Terrier
25-01-2017, 10:15 PM
There better be some new buys before the end of this window, no more lame excuses, they need to back the team.

Bit unfair that one Alto, Garlick has chucked £10 million at Hull and £13 million at Norwich and still the games continue!

Altobelli
25-01-2017, 10:24 PM
Bit unfair that one Alto, Garlick has chucked £10 million at Hull and £13 million at Norwich and still the games continue!

Sorry I don't agree with you TEC.

Garlick can (and its only gossip, rumour, paper Sh!te) chuck whatever he likes at Clubs for players, that is not the issue as Clubs will maybe accept that, the player has to accept our wage cap which is to a certain extent our downfall, as I've said it's possible if you do it right without betting the ranch.

Garlick and Co must see this but are unwilling to speculate to accumulate, do they think transfers/wage's are going down in the window after this one ? of course NOT, but that will be the same excuse when it comes you can bet your mortgage on it.

The Bedlington Terrier
25-01-2017, 10:25 PM
I'm shocked! Alto not agreeing with me. Now there's a first! :p

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
26-01-2017, 08:50 AM
Spaghettification

NOUN

The process by which (in some theories) an object would be stretched and ripped apart by gravitational forces on falling into a black hole.

Bit like why Garlic probably won't be putting his hand in his pocket. ;D

Altobelli
26-01-2017, 09:54 AM
I wonder if anyone has ever called him short arms long pockets ?

Altobelli
26-01-2017, 10:31 AM
FULMINATE verb (fuhl-muh-neyt)

verb

(1)To issue denunciations or the like (usually followed by against): The minister fulminated against legalized vice.

(2)To explode with a loud noise; detonate.

(3)To cause to explode.

(4)To issue or pronounce with vehement denunciation, condemnation, or the like.

noun

(1)One of a group of unstable, explosive compounds derived from fulminic acid, expecially the mercury alt of fulminic acid, which is a powerful detonating agent.

Quote:

Not a day passed when he did not fulminate against Batista (Tht ox ! That peasant !) or Castro.......
Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, 2007.

alfinyalcabo
26-01-2017, 11:48 AM
mercenary
ˈməːsɪn(ə)ri/
adjective
1.
primarily concerned with making money at the expense of ethics.
"she's nothing but a mercenary little gold-digger"
synonyms: money-oriented, grasping, greedy, acquisitive, avaricious, covetous, rapacious, bribable, venal, materialistic; informalmoney-grubbing
"research suggests that buyers are unashamedly mercenary"


"Snodgrass took the best money offer he could without any regard of which club it was"

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
26-01-2017, 12:06 PM
I wonder if anyone has ever called him short arms long pockets ?

Not sure but they are obviously very deep seeing as he can't reach the bottom to get anything out of them.>:(

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
26-01-2017, 12:09 PM
Hornswoggle

Hornswoggle means "to trick or hoax." It would be a deception for us to say we know the exact origin of hornswoggle, but its first known appearance in 1829 was in the US.

Now, is foofaraw an actual word, or are you being hornswoggled?

The Bedlington Terrier
26-01-2017, 12:30 PM
Discombobulated (Adj.)

As in TEC is, "very confused and disorganised in sorting out these conflicting transfer rumours". :(

Altobelli
26-01-2017, 11:41 PM
Discombobulated (Adj.)

As in TEC is, "very confused and disorganised in sorting out these conflicting transfer rumours". :(

That's one of my favourite words TEC :D

Altobelli
27-01-2017, 05:10 PM
SHIVOO noun (shi-voo)

noun

(1) Australian, a boisterous party or celebration.

Quotes:

For the new Year's shivoo the settlers all saved up, and they all dressed up.
D.H. Lawrence, The Boy in the Bush, 1924.

You see, I arranged to give a sort of a shivoo as soon as the cattle got here.
Louis Becke, Tom Gerrard, 1904.

Origin:
Shivoo, like many slang words and colloquialisms, has no solid etymology. It coriginated in Australia at the end of the 19th Century.

The Bedlington Terrier
27-01-2017, 05:30 PM
Bloviate - as in Donald Trump!

Altobelli
28-01-2017, 12:18 PM
CHANTICLEER noun (chan-tuh-kleer)

noun

1. Now Literary. a rooster: used as a proper name in medieval fables.

Quotes
Alas, that Chanticleer flew down from the rafters!
--*Geoffrey Chaucer (1342/43–1400),*"The Nun's Priest's Tale," The Canterbury Tales, Modern English prose translation by R. M. Lumiansky, 1948



The old cock which had for years behaved as well as any chanticleer in the county took to crowing in the middle of the night ...
--*William Jenkyn Thomas,*"The Power of St. Tegla's Well," The Welsh Fairy Book, 1907



Origin
Animal fables of a fox tricking a bird and of being “outfoxed” by that bird date to the mid-11th century in prose and poetry in Old French dialects and Medieval Latin. The most accessible version of Chanticleer and the Fox is in Chaucer’s “Nun’s Priest’s Tale,” a beast fable and mock epic dating to about 1390, in The Canterbury Tales. “Chanticleer,” the name of the “hero,” derives from the Old French “Chantecler,” which derives from chanter “to sing, crow” and the adjective cler “clear, loud” (clair in Modern French). The word entered English in the 14th century.

oldcolner
29-01-2017, 11:56 AM
From the Telegraphs description of Bristols defence with this 20 yards in front of their goalkeeper

enciente

noun-archaic

an enclosure or the enclosing wall of a fortified place.

Altobelli
29-01-2017, 01:28 PM
PARERGON noun (pa-rur-gon)


noun
1. something that is an accessory to a main work or subject; embellishment.
2. work undertaken in addition to one's principal work.

Quotes
It was what you might call a final exhibition--a last attack--a giddy par-ergon.
--*Rudyard Kipling,*Stalky & Co., 1899

Sometimes this making or doing was their profession; sometimes it was a parergon carried on deliciously in leisure hours.
--*A. P. Herbert,*The House by the River, 1921


Origin
Párergon, a Greek noun meaning “secondary business, side job” comes from the Greek preposition and prefix pará “alongside, beyond” and the (Attic) Greek noun érgon “work.” Other dialects, e.g., Doric, preserve the more conservative form wérgon, which shows more clearly the relationship between the modern English noun “work” (from Germanic werkam) and the ancient Greek forms. The ancient Greek and Germanic nouns derive from Proto-Indo-European wergom. The word entered English in the 17th century.

Altobelli
30-01-2017, 05:25 PM
EQUIVOQUE noun (ek-wuh-vohk)


noun
1. an equivocal term; an ambiguous expression.
2. a play on words; pun.
3. double meaning; ambiguity.

Quotes
The [French] language, too, suggests shades and "nuances" of colouring, that exist not in other tongues--you can give to your canvas the precise tint you wish, for when mystery would prove a merit, the equivoque is there ready to your hand, that means so much, yet asserts so little.
--*Charles Lever,*Arthur O'Leary: His wanderings and ponderings in many lands, 1845

Upon this point, however, an air of uncertainty is thrown by means of an equivoque, maintained throughout the paper, in respect to Mr. Miller's middle name.
--*Edgar Allan Poe,*"A Chapter on Autography," Graham's Magazine, 1841


Origin
Equivoque entered English in the late 1300s, and was originally spelled equivoc. It derives from the Late Latin term aequivocus meaning "ambiguous."

Altobelli
31-01-2017, 04:34 PM
KANONE noun (kuh-noh-nuh)

noun
1. a person who is an expert skier.

Quotes
So I was understandably a little nervous last spring in Telluride when I had the chance to meet Norman Vaughan, a man who has been, for many years, top kanone in my ski pantheon.
--*Peter Shelton,*"Norman, Kanon: In 1936 Vaughan wrote Ski Fever. In 1995 he still burns with passion." Ski, December 1995

... you'll have ski lessons so thorough, they'll swear you're a kanone by tour's end.
--*"The après-skier's guide to the Alps," Skiing, November 1968



Origin
Kanone came to English from the German word literally meaning "cannon," which comes from Italian cannone. This, in turn, derives from Italian canna "tube."

Altobelli
01-02-2017, 09:01 PM
ATARAXIA noun (at-uh-rak-see-uh)



noun
1. a state of freedom from emotional disturbance and anxiety; tranquillity.

Quotes
Remember that the goal of the great Epicurus was not an earthly he-done (Hedonism), or pleasure, but a lofty ataraxia, or freedom from cares and trivial thoughts.
--*H. P. Lovecraft,*Selected Letters, 1965–1976

"I feel lucid," he manages to say, "I want to think." She looks pleased. "We call that the ataraxia effect. It's so nice when it goes that way." Ataraxia, philosophical calm.
--*James Tiptree, Jr.,*"Houston, Houston, Do You Read?" 1976



Origin
Ataraxia “impassiveness, calmness” is best known from and associated with the ethics of the Athenian philosopher Epicurus (341–270 b.c.). It is acquired by shunning politics and obnoxious people, by paying no attention to the gods or an afterlife, and by devoting oneself to trustworthy friends and a simple life. Ataraxia was important to the Stoic philosophers, also, but for them the final goal was apatheia, which means not “apathy” in the modern sense but “calmness,” imperturbability gained from the pursuit of virtue. Ataraxia (spelled atarxie) entered English in the early 17th century.

Altobelli
02-02-2017, 12:49 PM
UMBRA noun (uhm-bruh)


noun
1. shade; shadow.
2. the invariable or characteristic accompaniment or companion of a person or thing.
3. Astronomy. a. the complete or perfect shadow of an opaque body, as a planet, where the direct light from the source of illumination is completely cut off. b.the dark central portion of a sunspot.
4. a phantom or shadowy apparition, as of someone or something not physically present; ghost; spectral image.

Quotes
Lancelot followed in her shadow. ... Only in the umbra of the old woman could he make his way.
--*J. Robert King,*Lancelot du Lethe, 2001

In the umbra of the statue they hung, neither looking at the other, not speaking.
--*Tanith Lee,*The Book of the Beast, 1988


Origin
Umbra entered English around the year 1600. It comes from the Latin term meaning "shade, shadow."

Altobelli
18-02-2017, 12:25 PM
CLOUDLAND noun (kloud-land)

noun

(1) The Sky

(2) A region of unreality, imagination, etc; dreamland.

Origin:

Cloudland entered English in the early 1800's. Cloud-Cuckoo-Land is a related term that comes from Greek Nephelokkygia, the realm which separated the gods from mankind in Aristophanes' The Birds.

Altobelli
18-02-2017, 01:33 PM
FEINSCHMECKER noun (fahyn-shmek-uh r)

noun
1. German. gourmet.

Quotes
Our haute feinschmecker takes time off to sample the lowly delights of the hamburger joint.
--*“Contents: Restaurants: Grind House Glories," New York, March 9, 1970

He's light-years ahead of you, a true scientist in the making and a feinschmecker of the highest order.
--*Anne Landsman,*The Rowing Lesson, 2007


Origin
The German noun Feinschmecker literally means ”fine-taster” from fein “fine” and Schmecker “taster.” The word entered English in the late 19th century.

Altobelli
18-02-2017, 01:45 PM
PARALOGIZE noun (puh-ral-uh-jahjz)

verb
1. to draw conclusions that do not follow logically from a given set of assumptions.

Quotes
"A brick," he retorted, "is a parallelogram; I am not a parallelogram, and therefore not a brick ..." "Charley Lightheart, you paralogize."
--*Stewart Edward White and Samuel Hopkins Adams,*The Mystery, 1907

Whether, moreover, in seeking to find an analogy between the laws of nature, and municipal laws, he does not paralogize, may perhaps be questioned.
--*Abraham Coles,*Abraham Coles: Biographical Sketch, Memorial Tributes, Selections from His Works (Some Hitherto Unpublished), 1892


Origin
Paralogize entered English from Medieval Latin paralogizāre, from Greek paralogízesthai meaning “to reason falsely.” It's been used in English since the late 1500s.

alfinyalcabo
18-02-2017, 03:24 PM
ARROGANCE
ˈarəɡ(ə)ns/
noun
the quality of being arrogant.
"the arrogance of this man is astounding"
synonyms: haughtiness, conceit, hubris, self-importance, egotism, sense of superiority; More

TEC says Lincoln will be brushed aside with ease

Altobelli
23-02-2017, 03:21 PM
BEASTIE noun (bee-stee)


noun
1. Chiefly Literary. a small animal, especially one toward which affection is felt.
2. Facetious. an insect; bug.
3. Canadian Slang (chiefly Alberta). construction worker.

Quotes
... John Silence watched the performance of the cat with profound attention and without interfering. Then he called to the animal by name. "Smoke, you mysterious beastie, what in the world are you about?"
--*Algernon Blackwood,*John Silence: Physician Extraordinary, 1908

I've found a wee beastie and he's hurt. May I keep him?
--*Joanne Bertin,*Bard's Oath, 2012


Origin
Beastie is best known from two Scottish sources: Robert Burns’s poem Tae a Moose (To a Mouse), “Wee sleekit, cow’rin, tim’rous beastie…”; and the traditional Scottish poem or prayer Things That Go Bump in the Night ”From ghoulies and ghosties / And long-leggedy beasties / And things that go bump in the night, / Good Lord, deliver us.” The word entered English in the late 18th century.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
24-02-2017, 08:24 AM
Barmecide
ADJECTIVE

Illusory or imaginary and therefore disappointing.

Altobelli
24-02-2017, 04:21 PM
SCAPEGRACE noun (skeyp-greys)

noun
1. a complete rogue or rascal; a habitually unscrupulous person; scamp.

Quotes
Tommy Bangs was the scapegrace of the school, and the most trying little scapegrace that ever lived. As full of mischief as a monkey, yet so good-hearted that one could not help forgiving his tricks ...
--*Louisa May Alcott,*Little Men, 1871

There was a mark of dignity, of silent power, on this tall scapegrace of a son of Hilary Vane that the railroad president had missed at first--probably because he had looked only for the scapegrace.
--*Winston Churchill,*Mr. Crewe's Career, 1908




Origin
Scapegrace literally means “one who has escaped or avoided God’s grace.” It derives from the archaic verb scape or ’scape “to escape.” The word entered English in the early 19th century.

outwoodclaret
24-02-2017, 04:32 PM
Barmecide
ADJECTIVE

Illusory or imaginary and therefore disappointing.

And I thought this was the murderous slaughter of a bread roll.

The Bedlington Terrier
24-02-2017, 08:32 PM
Lol!

Altobelli
25-02-2017, 03:51 PM
RUNNEL noun (ruhn-l)

noun
1. a small stream; brook; rivulet.
2. a small channel, as for water.

Quotes
It took me the whole day to reach the patch,--which I found indeed a forest--but not a rudiment of brook or runnel had I crossed!
--*George MacDonald,*Lilith, 1895

Fastening their boat to a willow, the friends landed in this silent, silver kingdom, and patiently explored the hedges, the hollow trees, the runnels and their little culverts, the ditches and dry waterways.
--*Kenneth Grahame,*The Wind in the Willows, 1908




Origin
Runnel entered English in the 1570s and combines the noun run (in the sense “small stream”) with the diminutive suffix -el.

Altobelli
26-02-2017, 06:36 PM
MERITORIOUS adjective (mer-i tawr-ee-uh s)

adjective

(1) Deserving praise, reward, esteem, etc; praiseworthy: to receive a gift for meitorious service.

Quotes:

It wasn't exactly a misdemeanor to be late to breakfast-it began promptly at eight o'clock-but it was distinctly meritorious not to be. Henry Kitchell Webster, The Real Adventure, 1916

Altobelli
27-02-2017, 04:42 PM
Bumbershoot noun

(1) Informal: Often Facetious. an umbrella.
Citations

Quotes

Don't try to hurry the job--it may take hours of intermittent attention to put such a bumbershoot back in working order. Next time, be sure the umbrella is dry before you close it.
-- "How to Repair an Umbrella," Popular Science , April 1957

Considering that he presented nearly two linebackers' worth of surface area to the rain, he would have needed a bumbershoot the size of a beach umbrella to shelter himself completely.
-- Dean Koontz, The Face , 2003

Origin

Bumbershoot entered English in the late 1800's. Bumbershoot- is a facetious alteration of umbrella and-shoot is a reselling of -chute from parachute.

alfinyalcabo
27-02-2017, 07:02 PM
Winnet

Top Definition. Winnet picker. A person who picks small dried peices of poo from their anal beard. Oh, no! I have winnets tied up in my bum fluff, I will have to look in the yellow pages for a winnet picker. :O

Altobelli
28-02-2017, 03:57 PM
Winnet

Top Definition. Winnet picker. A person who picks small dried peices of poo from their anal beard. Oh, no! I have winnets tied up in my bum fluff, I will have to look in the yellow pages for a winnet picker. :O

Where do you get these strange/odd/off the wall but unique words alf ?

Altobelli
28-02-2017, 04:01 PM
SHRIVE verb (shrahyv)

verb
1. to grant absolution to (a penitent).
2. to impose penance on (a sinner).
3. to hear the confession of (a person).
4. Archaic. to hear confessions.
5. Archaic. to go to or make confession; confess one's sins, as to a priest.

Quotes
Father Hugo says that in time of war, even if there is no priest to shrive you, your sins can be forgiven this way.
--*Diana Gabaldon,*Dragonfly in Amber, 1992

"Shrive me quickly, then," she said, laughing. "Now, without confession? Would you have me read your thoughts and give penance?"
--*H. Bedford-Jones,*"The Mardi Gras Mystery," Short Stories, August 1920


Origin
Shrive is a borrowing from Latin scrībere “to write, draw” and occurs in all the Germanic languages except Gothic, e.g., Old Norse skrifa “to write, draw,” Old High German scrîban, German schreiben. Old English scrīfan and Middle English shriven, schrifen mean “to impose a penance on (a penitent)” and by extension “to hear (someone’s) confession, absolve (someone).” Shrive entered English before 900.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
01-03-2017, 08:56 AM
BILBOES
PLURAL NOUN

An iron bar with sliding shackles, formerly used for confining a prisoner's ankles.

Altobelli
01-03-2017, 03:36 PM
BILBOES
PLURAL NOUN

An iron bar with sliding shackles, formerly used for confining a prisoner's ankles.

I'm sure Turfmoorspirit knows about the above ;D

Altobelli
01-03-2017, 03:41 PM
DUDGEON noun (duhj-uh n)

noun
1. a feeling of offense or resentment; anger: We left in high dudgeon.

Quotes
We had only been married three weeks and she had already walked out in high dudgeon five or six times. I could never understand what I did to put her in high dudgeon, but whatever it was I always felt utterly to blame.
--*Larry McMurtry,*All My Friends Are Going to Be Strangers, 1972

Carson bent, showing patches on the back of faded clothes, clawed the air at one side of him without turning his head, and spoke with injured tones of imperial dudgeon.
--*Raymond Knister,*White Narcissus, 1929


Origin
Dudgeon entered English in the 1560s and is of uncertain origin.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
02-03-2017, 09:08 AM
DORYPHORE
NOUN

rare
A pedantic and annoyingly persistent critic.

Theres a few on this forum at times !! O:)

The Bedlington Terrier
02-03-2017, 09:34 AM
Where do you get these strange/odd/off the wall but unique words alf ?

Alto, it's because Alf lives in a world of strange/odd/off the wall dudes and dudesses:D.

Altobelli
02-03-2017, 10:12 AM
Alto, it's because Alf lives in a world of strange/odd/off the wall dudes and dudesses:D.

I'm sure Mrs Alf has a lot to do with it Terrier.

Altobelli
02-03-2017, 11:14 AM
EXCORIATE verb (ik-skawr-ee-eyt)


verb
1. to denounce or berate severely; flay verbally: He was excoriated for his mistakes.
2. to strip off or remove the skin from: Her palms were excoriated by the hard labor of shoveling.

Quotes
Jonathan Swift once observed, “Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody’s face but their own,” and so it might be charged, too, of satirists who excoriate others while exempting themselves from blame.
--*Joyce Carol Oates,*"Showtime," The New Yorker, October 27, 2003

The accompanying editorial went on to excoriate him and those who served under him.
--*Leighton Gage,*Dying Gasp, 2010


Origin
In Latin the verb excoriāre meant only “to strip the skin, bark, shell” (it also had an obscene sense). The modern sense “to denounce, upbraid” arose in English in the late 19th century. Excoriate in its Latin senses entered English in the late 15th century.

Altobelli
03-03-2017, 07:55 PM
MALFEASANCE noun (mal-fee-zuh-ns)


noun
1. Law. the performance by a public official of an act that is legally unjustified, harmful, or contrary to law; wrongdoing (used especially of an act in violation of a public trust).

Quotes
The mid-nineteen-seventies was a revolutionary moment in investigative reporting—the perhaps inevitable aftermath of Woodward and Bernstein, with stories on C.I.A. operations, military cover-ups, and Congressional malfeasance all over the front pages.
--*Seymour M. Hersh,*"Scooped by Mike Wallace," The New Yorker, April 8, 2012

All reports in Tahiti declared her husband to have been precisely the man he'd always seemed: a gentle virtuous soul, incapable of malfeasance, too good for this world.
--*Elizabeth Gilbert,*The Signature of All Things, 2013


Origin
Tracing the history of the word malfeasance (with an earlier spelling male-feasance) “illegal act, official misconduct” is as disorienting as getting lost in a hall of mirrors. The phrase Male-feasance and Mis-feasance is first recorded in 1663. Misfeasance (spelled misfeasance) “wrongful use of lawful authority” is first recorded in Sir Francis Bacon’s The Elements of the Common Lawes of England (1630). Male-feasance may be a reworking of misfeasance with replacement of the combining form mis- with mal-. The law being very traditional in its terminology, the change of prefix may have been influenced by malfeasor (variously spelled) “malefactor,” which had a very brief history in print—less than a century—and was obsolete by the late 15th century.

Altobelli
04-03-2017, 07:48 AM
LOTUS-EATER noun (loh-tuh s-ee-ter)

noun
1. a person who leads a life of dreamy, indolent ease, indifferent to the busy world; daydreamer.
2. Classical Mythology. a member of a people whom Odysseus found existing in a state of languorous forgetfulness induced by their eating of the fruit of the legendary lotus; one of the lotophagi.

Quotes
Octavia passed the days in a kind of lotus-eater's dream. Books, hammocks, correspondence with a few intimate friends, a renewed interest in her old water-color box and easel--these disposed of the sultry hours of daylight.
--*O. Henry,*"Madame Bo-Peep, of the Ranches," Whirligigs, 1910

The mood of transcendent ease made me feel as blissful as a lotus-eater, as though I were experiencing a slow afternoon in eternity.
--*Lawrence Millman,*"Yap Magic," Islands, May–June 1999


Origin
In book 9 of the Odyssey, Odysseus tells the story of being blown off course for nine days as he was rounding Cape Malea (the southern tip of the Peloponnesus) westward toward Ithaca, his home island. On the tenth day Odysseus and his companions landed on an unnamed island that the Greek historian Herodotus (5th century b.c.) located on the Libyan coast. The Greek historian Polybius (2nd century b.c.) specifically identified the island as Meninx (now Djerba) off the Tunisian coast. The Greek noun lōtós “lotus” in ancient times referred to several different herbs, plants, shrubs, and trees. One of these, the shrub Ziziphus lotus, is often thought to be the lotus of the Odyssey. Lotus-eater entered English in the 17th century.

Altobelli
05-03-2017, 02:42 PM
SALAAM noun (suh-lahm)

noun
1. a salutation meaning “peace,” used especially in Islamic countries.
2. a very low bow or obeisance, especially with the palm of the right hand placed on the forehead.
verb
1. to salute with a salaam.

Quotes
And the black-birds too are dozing, and the bulbuls flitting by whisper with their wings, 'salaam.' Peace and salaam!
--*Ameen Rihani,*The Book of Khalid, 1911

"Salaam aleikum" (Peace be with you), I said, and sat down.
--*Rory Stewart,*The Places in Between, 2004


Origin
Salaam is the most common English spelling of the Arabic noun salām “peace.” Salaam is closely related to the Hebrew shalom (šālōm), both coming from the common Semitic noun šalām “peace, well-being” (from the root šlm “to be whole”). Both Arabic and Hebrew use “peace” in their formulas of greeting: the complete Arabic formula is as-salāmu ʿalaykum “peace to you”; the kindred Hebrew formula is shālōm ʿalēkhem. Salaam entered English in the 17th century.

Altobelli
06-03-2017, 04:09 PM
FUSILLADE noun (fyoo.suh.leyd)

noun
1. a general discharge or outpouring of anything: a fusillade of questions.
2. a simultaneous or continuous discharge of firearms.
verb
1. to attack or shoot by a fusillade.

Quotes
During this unprecedented fusillade of blows the Gangster hunkered down and didn't move except to deflect the stray chop away from his face.
--*Junot Díaz,*The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, 2007

The "pitchfork senator" stood their fusillade of questions for about an hour, and then went home in disgust, and the balance of the meeting was a strictly party affair.
--*Upton Sinclair,*The Jungle, 1906


Origin
Fusillade comes from the French verb fusiler “to shoot.” The suffix -ade is found in nouns denoting action or process or a person or persons acting, and is often found in French loanwords. Fusillade entered English in the late 18th century.

Altobelli
07-03-2017, 04:01 PM
MIDDLESCENCE noun (mid-l-es-uh ns)

noun
1. the middle-age period of life, especially when considered a difficult time of self-doubt and readjustment.

Quotes

Just as poor Alonso Quijano, in middle age, was so bewitched by the novels of chivalry that he declared himself Don Quixote de la Mancha, the Knight of Doleful Aspect, so the skipper of Rocinante Cuatro, in his middlescence, was led by his passion for Cervantes's novel to identify himself with both its hero and, eventually, its author.
--*John Barth,*The Tidewater Tales, 1987

He can tint out the gray in his hair, tone up the doughy muscles of middlescence on the most exquisitely devised exercise tables in Manhattan, take the woman of his choice out to dinner at "21," and take back any traces of psychic discomfort to a Park Avenue psychiatrist.
--*Gail Sheehy,*"Catch-30 and Other Predictable Crises of Growing Up Adult," New York, February 18, 1974


Origin

Middlescence is a blend of middle and adolescence. It entered English in the 1960s.

Altobelli
08-03-2017, 04:40 PM
PORTMANTEAU noun (pawrt-man-toh)

noun
1. Also called portmanteau word. Linguistics. a word made by putting together parts of other words, as motel, made from motor and hotel, brunch, from breakfast and lunch, or guesstimate, from guess and estimate.
2. a case or bag to carry clothing in while traveling, especially a leather trunk or suitcase that opens into two halves.

Quotes
"Well, 'slithy' means 'lithe and slimy.' 'Lithe' is the same as 'active.' You see it's like a portmanteau--there are two meanings packed up into one word."
--*Lewis Carroll,*Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1871

Portmanteaus, or “blends”, according to Ian Roberts, linguistics professor at the University of Cambridge, have been around for more than a century. They exist "mainly as a journalistic fad"—to describe a phenomenon to a mass audience. For example, the word “smog” was first coined in 1905 by one Dr H.A des Voeux of the Coal Smoke Abatement Society to describe the smoky fog, or “smog”, prevalent in British cities.
--*M.S.L.J.,*"From smog to mother fubber," The Economist, August 12, 2013


Origin
A portmanteau was originally a kind of bag or case that opened by a hinge into two equal parts, e.g., a Gladstone bag or a suitcase. Lewis Carroll changed its meaning forever when Humpty Dumpty explicates the nonsense poem “Jabberwocky” that Alice recites to him in chapter six of Through the Looking Glass (1871): “Well, ‘slithy’ means ‘lithe and slimy.’… You see it’s like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word.” Humpty Dumpty so carried the day that modern linguists and grammarians routinely use portmanteau and portmanteau word as technical terms. Portmanteau in its original sense entered English in the 16th century.

Altobelli
09-03-2017, 05:04 PM
NEWSPEAK noun (noo-speek)


noun
1. (sometimes initial capital letter) an official or semiofficial style of writing or saying one thing in the guise of its opposite, especially in order to serve a political or ideological cause while pretending to be objective, as in referring to “increased taxation” as “revenue enhancement.”

Quotes
A fellow Guardian writer remarked on immigration minister Peter Dutton speaking on ABC Radio National this week, in which he described people in a Nauru camp as “transferees” (a name implying motion) for people indefinitely stuck in a camp. “It is Newspeak of the highest order,” he said.
--*Brigid Delaney,*"Orwell's nightmare vision of 1984 is always right here, right now," The Guardian, October 22, 2015

They may take up, in the official Newspeak, "the broadening of the sphere of commodity and money relations." In translation: moves toward a market economy.
--*Edwin Diamond,*"Lenin Meets Letterman: TV Under Glasnost," New York, April 3, 1989


Origin

Newspeak was coined by George Orwell in his novel 1984, which was published in 1949.

Altobelli
10-03-2017, 05:59 PM
STRAVAGE noun (struh-veyg)

verb
1. Scot., Irish, and North England. to wander aimlessly.
2. to saunter; stroll.

Quotes
What made ye stravage about the cliffs, castin' sheeps' eyes at some one we know, an' lookin' pitchforks at me an' Long William?
--*Shan F. Bullock,*The Charmer: A Seaside Comedy, 1897

Monks should stay in their cells, not stravage about in castles.
--*Anne Fremantle,*By Grace of Love, 1957


Origin

Stravage is formed by aphesis (loss of the first, unaccented syllable) of ex- from the Medieval Latin verb extrāvagārī “to wander out of bounds.” The Latin verb vagārī, vagāre “to ramble, wander” derives from the adjective vagus “strolling, unsettled.” The participial stem of the verb, vagrant-, is the source of English vagrant. Stravage entered English in the 18th century.

The Bedlington Terrier
10-03-2017, 08:29 PM
Sounds a lot like Boydy. Stravages around aimlessly!

3716

Altobelli
11-03-2017, 08:58 PM
Yes we will have to call him Stravage Boyd from now on :)

Altobelli
11-03-2017, 09:01 PM
CANARD noun (kuh-nahrd)

noun
1. a false or baseless, usually derogatory story, report, or rumor.
2. Cookery. a duck intended or used for food.
3. Aeronautics. a. an airplane that has its horizontal stabilizer and elevators located forward of the wing. b. Also called canard wing. one of two small lifting wings located in front of the main wings. c. an early airplane having a pusher engine with the rudder and elevator assembly in front of the wings.

Quotes

This week, Lewandowski distinguished himself by reviving the birther canard—the thoroughly debunked conspiracy theory that Barack Obama was not born in the United States.
--*Margaret Talbot,*"The Trouble with Corey Lewandowski on CNN," The New Yorker, August 6, 2016

In London that night poor Henderson's telegram describing the gradual unscrewing of the shot was judged to be a canard, and his evening paper, after wiring for authentication from him and receiving no reply ... decided not to print a special edition.
--*H. G. Wells,*The War of the Worlds, 1898


Origin

Canard is from Old French quanart “drake,” literally “cackler,” from the onomatopoeic caner “to cackle” and the suffix -art, a variant of -ard, as in mallard or braggart. Canard is all that is left of the Middle French idiom vendre un canard à moitié “to sell half a duck,” i.e., “to take in, swindle, cheat.” Canard entered English in the 19th century.

The Bedlington Terrier
12-03-2017, 08:02 AM
That bloody TEC with his TAXI rumours and canards.

Glad to see the back of him!

Wonder if he got a ...

3731

Altobelli
12-03-2017, 01:27 PM
LUCIFEROUS adjective (loo-sif-er-uh s)

adjective
1. bringing or providing light.
2. providing insight or enlightenment.

Quotes
An illumination on so vast a scale could be kept up only by the inexhaustible magazine of ether disseminated through space, and ever ready to manifest its luciferous properties on large spheres, whose attraction renders it sufficiently dense for the play of chemical affinity.
--*D. Vaughan,*"On the Light of Suns, Meteors, and Temporary Stars," Report on the Twenty-Seventh Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1858

I took a vial, containing some luciferous matter, that was not apt to shine long at a time; and being well stopp'd, I kept it till the flame, or light within it, expired ...
--*Robert Boyle,*The Philosophical Works of the Honourable Robert Boyle, Volume 3, 1725


Origin
Luciferous comes from Latin lūcifer “morning star,” literally, “light-bringing.” It entered English in the mid-1600s.

The Bedlington Terrier
12-03-2017, 03:10 PM
Sounds a lot like TEC to me! :D

Altobelli
12-03-2017, 06:00 PM
That bloody TEC with his TAXI rumours and canards.

Glad to see the back of him!

Wonder if he got a ...




Sounds a lot like TEC to me! :D

This TEC sounds like a right @rsehole Terrier.

Altobelli
13-03-2017, 03:31 PM
HEART-WHOLE adjective (hahrt-hohl)

adjective
1. not in love.
2. wholehearted; sincere.

Quotes
... it may be said of him that Cupid hath clapped him o' the shoulder, but I'll warrant him heart-whole.
--*William Shakespeare,*As You Like It, 1623

"What," said he, "have I flirted with so many girls in my own way of life, and come away heart-whole, and now to fall in love with a gentlewoman, who would bid her footman show me the door if she knew of my presumption!"
--*Charles Reade,*Put Yourself in His Place, 1870


Origin

Heart-whole came to English in the 1400s from late Middle English.

The Bedlington Terrier
13-03-2017, 07:52 PM
I know a few arseholes if that helps?

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
14-03-2017, 10:39 AM
Inaniloquent

Pertaining to idle talk, tending to speak inanely; loquacious; garrulous

Altobelli
14-03-2017, 03:25 PM
ARITHMANCY noun (at-ith-man-see)

noun
1. divination by the use of numbers, especially by the number of letters in names. Also arithmomancy.

Quotes
A correspondent who has charge of the arithmancy department of this Magazine, and who is now engaged in constructing a system that will enable us to calculate the periodicity of South American revolutions, and the probable advent of what is called "early spring" in New England, sends to the Drawer the following timely figures bearing upon the immediate future of France ...
--*"Editor's Drawer," Harper's Monthly Magazine June to November, 1883

In modern languages such as English, many different systems of arithmancy have been produced, none of them entirely satisfactory. The most basic, which is much used in the popular numerology but also can be found in Renaissance occult writings, simply gives each letter the number of its place in the alphabet ...
--*John Michael Greer,*Secrets of the Lost Symbol, 2009


Origin

Arithmancy, a kind of divination by numerology, derives from the Greek nouns arithmós “number, a number, amount” and manteía “prophetic power, divination.” The Greeks practiced (and condemned) all sorts of divination, e.g., necromancy, the black art of communicating with ghosts, as in the Odyssey and in the Bible when King Saul consults the “Witch of Endor” in 1 Samuel; oneiromancy, the interpretation of dreams (Aristotle); oracles (as at Delphi); and the perennial astrology. In arithmancy numerical values were assigned to the letters of the alphabet: A = 1, B = 2, etc. Words and especially proper names converted into numbers had power, probably the most famous being “the number of the beast…666” in the New Testament book of the Apocalypse (Revelation). Arithmancy entered English in the 16th century.

map
14-03-2017, 03:49 PM
颜色狼 = colour wolf - cheat - liar - unfauthful

Altobelli
14-03-2017, 05:03 PM
颜色狼 = colour wolf - cheat - liar - unfauthful

http://i64.tinypic.com/ezefk0.jpg

Altobelli
14-03-2017, 05:06 PM
How's it going in China Map ?

map
14-03-2017, 05:14 PM
Very well, thanks Altobelli...although a little tiring, too many classes :)

Altobelli
14-03-2017, 05:19 PM
At least you are off this sinking ship we call the UK ;D

As long as you are healthy, making the money and enjoying the social life out there that is all that matters, wish I was there with you, take care, have to go as Matron will be in soon and I have to get the tea on.

The Bedlington Terrier
14-03-2017, 06:24 PM
Inaniloquent

Pertaining to idle talk, tending to speak inanely; loquacious; garrulous

Alf, this one sounds a lot like you! :D

Altobelli
15-03-2017, 02:21 PM
CIMMERIAN adjective (si-meer-ee-uh-n)

adjective
1. very dark; gloomy: deep, Cimmerian caverns.
2. Classical Mythology. of, relating to, or suggestive of a western people believed to dwell in perpetual darkness.

Quotes

The sunny English noon had swallowed him as completely as if he had gone out into Cimmerian night.
--*Edith Wharton,*"Afterward," Tales of Men and Ghosts, 1910

... the darkness had become inky. Only the light from cabin windows which lay on the wet deck like shafts of silver relieved that Cimmerian effect.
--*Frederic S. Isham,*A Man and His Money, 1912


Origin

Cimmerian, also spelled Kimmerian, comes from the Latin plural noun Cimmeriī, a borrowing from the Greek plural noun Kimmérioi. In the Odyssey the mythical Cimmerians lived at the edge of Oceanus that surrounds the earth in a city wrapped in mist and fog, where the sun never shines, near the entrance to Hades. The historical, “real” Cimmerians are mentioned in Assyrian sources (Gimirri), the Hebrew Bible (Gomer in Genesis 10:2), and by the Greek historian Herodotus (5th century b.c.). Herodotus says that the Cimmerians were nomads driven south from the steppes of southern Russia by the Scythians through the Caucasus Mountains, turned west, and c676 b.c. overthrew the kingdom of Phrygia (in west central Turkey), whose last king was Midas. The connection between myth and history is that there are variant readings for Homer’s Kimmérioi—Cheimérioi, “Wintry People, Stormy people”; and Kerbérioi “Cerberus’s People,” both of which were displaced by the historical Cimmerians. Cimmerian entered English in the 16th century in reference to the nomads, and in the 19th century in reference to the Homeric people.

The Bedlington Terrier
15-03-2017, 05:44 PM
Is this like Ewood Park Alto?

Altobelli
15-03-2017, 07:14 PM
Is this like Ewood Park Alto?

http://i64.tinypic.com/ezefk0.jpg

Altobelli
16-03-2017, 02:58 PM
CODE-SWITCHING noun (kohd-swich-ing)

noun
1. the modifying of one's behavior, appearance, etc., to adapt to different sociocultural norms: For many female Muslim students, code-switching from their home environment to that of school requires forgoing the hijab.
2. Linguistics. the alternating or mixed use of two or more languages, especially within the same discourse: My grandma’s code-switching when we cook together reminds me of my family's origins. Bilingual students are discouraged from code-switching during class.
3. Sociolinguistics. the use of one dialect, register, accent, or language variety over another, depending on social or cultural context, to project a specific identity: Politicians use code-switching on the campaign trail to connect with their audience.

Quotes

In many respects, Lori's adaptability--her gift for cultural "code switching," as sociologists put it--qualified her as something of an L.A. archetype, the perfect chameleon for a landscape that is as seductive, maddening, electric, and fragmented as any on this planet.
--*Jesse Katz,*"The Two Worlds of Lori Gonzalez," Los Angeles, January 2001

Given all that black women are forced to deal with--from police brutality to being told that our natural hair is unprofessional--it isn't surprising that we learn to create armor between ourselves and the rest of the world. This armor takes a variety of forms. But one particular to the black community is code switching.
--*Angelica Jade Bastién,*"'Insecure' Season 1, Episode 3: Code Switching," New York Times, October 23, 2016


Origin

Code-switching entered English in the 1950s.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
17-03-2017, 08:05 AM
Doryphore
NOUN

A pedantic and annoyingly persistent critic.;D

The Bedlington Terrier
17-03-2017, 08:29 AM
Doryphore
NOUN

A pedantic and annoyingly persistent critic.;D

Plenty of them post on here! :D

Altobelli
18-03-2017, 04:01 PM
VAUNTING adjective (vawn-ting)

adjective
1. having a boastfully proud disposition: a vaunting dictator.
2. marked by boastful pride: a vaunting air of superiority.

Quotes
The time is coming when all men will see that the gift of God to the soul is not a vaunting, overpowering, excluding sanctity, but a sweet, natural goodness, a goodness like thine and mine ...
--*Ralph Waldo Emerson,*"An Address Delivered Before the Senior Class in Divinity College, 1838," Nature; Addresses, and Lectures, 1849

Kilgore is a vaunting, strutting caricature of military prowess, yet when we watch him in action, riding in with him as the copters pulverize a village, we may experience for the first time the insane electric fantasy of power that draws some men into war.
--*David Denby,*"Hollow Movie," New York, August 27, 1979


Origin
Vaunting entered English in the late 1500s. It comes from Middle English vaunten, from Middle French vanter “to boast,” from Late Latin vānitāre. Vaunting shares its roots with Latin vānus “vain.”

The Bedlington Terrier
18-03-2017, 07:06 PM
Watching Arsenal today, Wenger's vaunting days are well and truly over. :(

Altobelli
18-03-2017, 08:16 PM
I didn't have time to post yesterdays so here it is.

SMARAGDINE adjective (smuh-rag-din)



adjective
1. emerald-green in color.
2. of or relating to emeralds.
noun
1. Rare. smaragd.

Quotes
The big doors to the water were open, giving an occasional draft of welcome cool air, and you could see smudges of black woodsmoke drifting out over the smaragdine brightness of the harbor.
--*S. M. Stirling,*Island in the Sea of Time, 1998

He loomed above them turning his head back and forth with malevolent smaragdine-colored eyes.
--*Byron Tetrick,*"The Collegeum of Mauge," Songs of the Dying Earth, edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois, 2009


Origin

The Greek words smáragdos, máragdos “emerald” are not Greek in origin. Most likely the words are borrowed from Prakrit (any of the ancient or medieval Indic languages, e.g., Pali, the language of the Buddha, derived from Sanskrit) maragada- (from Sanskrit marakata), and are related to Akkadian barraqtu and Hebrew bāreqeth “gemstone, emerald,” from the Semitic root brq “to shine, flash.” Smaragdine entered English in the 14th century.

The Bedlington Terrier
18-03-2017, 08:25 PM
England got a real taste of the good old emerald green smaragdine today in Dublin.

Balanbam00
19-03-2017, 05:51 AM
Taqiyya: (Deception, Lying and Taqiyya)

......is an Islamic term referring to precautionary dissimulation or denial of religious belief and practice in the face of persecution.
Muslim scholars teach that Muslims should generally be truthful to each other, unless the purpose of lying is to "smooth over differences."
There are several forms of lying to non-believers that are permitted under certain circumstances, the best known being taqiyya. These circumstances are typically those that advance the cause of Islam - in some cases by gaining the trust of non-believers in order to draw out their vulnerability and defeat them.

Quran (16:106) - Establishes that there are circumstances that can "compel" a Muslim to tell a lie.
Quran (3:28) - This verse tells Muslims not to take those outside the faith as friends, unless it is to "guard themselves" against danger, meaning that there are times when a Muslim should appear friendly to non-Muslims, even though they should not feel that way..
Quran (2:225) - "Allah will not call you to account for thoughtlessness in your oaths, but for the intention in your hearts"

Taken collectively these verses are interpreted to mean that there are circumstances when a Muslim may be "compelled" to deceive others for a greater purpose.

Altobelli
19-03-2017, 11:04 PM
Taqiyya: (Deception, Lying and Taqiyya)

......is an Islamic term referring to precautionary dissimulation or denial of religious belief and practice in the face of persecution.
Muslim scholars teach that Muslims should generally be truthful to each other, unless the purpose of lying is to "smooth over differences."
There are several forms of lying to non-believers that are permitted under certain circumstances, the best known being taqiyya. These circumstances are typically those that advance the cause of Islam - in some cases by gaining the trust of non-believers in order to draw out their vulnerability and defeat them.

Quran (16:106) - Establishes that there are circumstances that can "compel" a Muslim to tell a lie.
Quran (3:28) - This verse tells Muslims not to take those outside the faith as friends, unless it is to "guard themselves" against danger, meaning that there are times when a Muslim should appear friendly to non-Muslims, even though they should not feel that way..
Quran (2:225) - "Allah will not call you to account for thoughtlessness in your oaths, but for the intention in your hearts"

Taken collectively these verses are interpreted to mean that there are circumstances when a Muslim may be "compelled" to deceive others for a greater purpose.

Each to their own Balanbam, I don't recognise any religion or faith, but I also don't have anything against folk who believe in religion, be it Islamic, Christian or any other, even if I do think there are flaws in all of them, and your quotes above from the Quran IMO are totally off the wall.

Altobelli
19-03-2017, 11:06 PM
OVERWINTER verb (oh-ver-win-ter)

verb
1. to pass, spend, or survive the winter: to overwinter on the Riviera.

Quotes

Each fall, millions of delicate orange and black butterflies fly more than two thousand miles from the United States and Canada to overwinter in the mountains of central Mexico.
--*Mary Alice Monroe,*The Butterfly's Daughter, 2011

Most bee species in northern climates overwinter in dormant stages.
--*C. Claiborne Ray,*"The Bee Solution to Winter," New York Times, January 26, 2015


Origin

Old English had the verb oferwintran “to get through the winter,” but it became obsolete at the end of the Old English period (about 1150). Overwinter was formed anew at the end of the 19th century on the model of Scandinavian, e.g., Danish and Norwegian overvintre, Swedish övervintra; Dutch overwinteren; or German überwintern.

The Bedlington Terrier
20-03-2017, 06:57 AM
Next year I intend to overwinter in Fuerteventura and sod this climate for a game of soldiers.

Altobelli
20-03-2017, 10:19 AM
Next year I intend to overwinter in Fuerteventura and sod this climate for a game of soldiers.

Good for you Terrier, I'm pleased for you, if only Matron would do the same and follow me to Turkey.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
20-03-2017, 10:43 AM
Next year I intend to overwinter in Fuerteventura and sod this climate for a game of soldiers.

Absquatulate
VERB

North American
humorous
no object, with adverbial Leave abruptly.

The Terrier was middle aged and a successful Lancashire financier with teenage children when he absquatulated to Fuertevetura to become a drinker.’ ;D

The Bedlington Terrier
20-03-2017, 03:49 PM
"The mildly drinking Terrier was middle aged and a not very successful Lancashire financier with teenage children when he absquatulated to Fuerteventura to become a very serious drinker and sun seeker indeed!" :D

Altobelli
20-03-2017, 04:33 PM
PRE-EMPT verb (pri-empt)

verb

(1) take action in order to prevent (an anticipated event) happening; forestall.
"the government pre-empted a coup attempt"synonyms: forestall, prevent;

(2) acquire or appropriate (something) in advance.
"many tables were already pre-empted by family parties"synonyms: commandeer, take possession of, occupy, seize, ARROGATE.

Origin

mid 19th century: back-formation from pre-emption.

Altobelli
20-03-2017, 04:41 PM
ARROGATE verb

verb

(1) To claim unwarrantably or presumptuously; assume or appropriate to oneself without right: to arrogate the right to make decisions.

Origin

1530-40; < Latin.

Altobelli
21-03-2017, 05:12 PM
COMPORTMENT noun

noun
1. personal bearing or conduct; demeanor; behavior.

Quotes
Miss Baker and Miss Inglis had founded the school back in 1911, in the words of the charter, "to educate girls in the humanities and sciences and to cultivate in them a love of learning, a modest comportment, an amiable grace, and an interest in civic duty above all."
--*Jeffrey Eugenides,*Middlesex, 2002

Scooby-Doo is not a dog. Granted, he does have the comportment and vocal characteristic of a canine, but this is, in fact, the tragic consequence of a botched elective surgery that Scooby underwent at the hands of his friend Shaggy, who was briefly enrolled in a plastic-surgery program at a medical school that he no longer attends.
--*Colin Stokes,*"The Truth About Hello Kitty," The New Yorker, August 29, 2014


Origin

Comportment came to English from Middle French in the late 1500s. The word comport ultimately derives from the Latin verb comportāre “to transport.”

Altobelli
21-03-2017, 05:16 PM
ANTHOPHILOUS adjective

adjective
1. attracted by or living among flowers.
2. feeding on flowers, as certain insects. Also, anthophagous.

Quotes

For you: anthophilous, lover of flowers, / green roses, chrysanthemums, lilies; retrophilia / philocaly, philomath, sarcophilous--all this love, / of the past, of beautify, of knowledge, of flesh ...
--*Reginald Dwayne Betts,*"For you: anthophilous, lover of flowers," Poetry, September 2011

... we are probably justified in concentrating our attention on adaptation to the needs and preferences of flower-visiting (anthophilous) animals that may be effective pollinators.
--*Herbert G. Baker and Irene Baker,*"Studies of Nectar-Constitution and Pollinator-Plant Coevolution," Coevolution of Animals and Plants, 1975


Origin

The first half of anthophilous comes from the Greek noun ánthos “flower,” which is related to Sanskrit ándha- “the soma plant” (still unidentified). The element -phil comes from Greek phílos “friend, friendly, dear.” It also means “one’s own, own” and for that reason may be a loan word into Greek from Lydian (an Anatolian language spoken in the ancient kingdom of Lydia, in modern western Turkey, whose last king was Croesus) bilis “his.” The Greek and Lydian words come from the Proto-Indo-European root bhilo-, bhili- “harmonious, suitable, friendly.” Anthophilous entered English in the 19th century.

outwoodclaret
22-03-2017, 09:47 AM
Floccinaucinihilipilification Noun

The action or habit of estimating something as worthless.

Example

a politician's promises maybe?

Altobelli
22-03-2017, 05:51 PM
ORT noun (awrt)

noun
1. a scrap or morsel of food left at a meal. Usually, orts.

Quotes

... the poor thought that the rich were entirely in the right of it to lead a jolly life; besides, their feasting caused a multiplication of orts, which were the heirlooms of the poor.
--*George Eliot,*Silas Marner, 1861

Gulls still followed the brig on the chance that some orts would be thrown overboard by the cook, but the noon meal had been no more than what the Highlanders called a strupak and the Americans called a lick and a smell.
--*Elisabeth Ogilvie,*The World of Jennie G., 1986


Origin

Ort entered English in the 1400s. Low German ort and early Dutch oorete are cognates.

alfinyalcabo
22-03-2017, 05:56 PM
Terrorist...Meaning
The lowest of the low and scum of the earth who kills innocent people

Altobelli
22-03-2017, 06:01 PM
Terrorist...Meaning
The lowest of the low and scum of the earth who kills innocent people

http://i63.tinypic.com/35coc5c.jpg

Altobelli
23-03-2017, 04:10 PM
THROTTLEBOTTOM noun (throt-l-bot-uh m)

noun
1. (sometimes lowercase) a harmless incompetent in public office.

Quotes

If there was one function that any vice president, even a Throttlebottom, could be expected to perform it was to represent the president and the country at funerals of notables abroad.
--*Carl Solberg,*Hubert Humphrey: A Biography, 1984

His excess of humility on being thrust from the job of Throttlebottom to the job of chief executive was a purely temporary phenomenon.
--*John Chamberlain,*"Washington in June," Life, June 11, 1945


Origin

The term Throttlebottom was formed after the character Alexander Throttlebottom in the musical comedy Of Thee I Sing (1932).

Altobelli
24-03-2017, 05:46 PM
ESOTERICA plural noun (es-uh-ter-I-kuh)

plural noun
1. things understood by or meant for a select few; recondite matters or items.
2. curiosa.

Quotes

At the G20 he was in his element—an instinctively global leader wading through esoterica that most people couldn't grasp, taking charge by dint of his superior knowledge.
--*"Why Gordon Brown Struggles So Mightily," Newsweek, June 11, 2009

When Dan Brown unleashed The Da Vinci Code in 2003 ... he was simply bringing this obsession with esoterica into the mainstream.
--*Frances Stonor Saunders,*"Leonardo da Vinci: the myth and the man," The Guardian, October 21, 2011


Origin

Esoterica is a noun derived from the Greek adjective esōterikós “belonging to the initiate, inner, esoteric.” Esōterikós has a distinguished history in ancient Greek philosophical systems (Pythagorean, Aristotelian, Stoic). Esoterica, if not coined by Ogden Nash (1902–71), was popularized by him in a poem of his published in The New Yorker in 1930. The poem contains the line “The postal authorities of the United States of America Frown on Curiosa, Erotica and Esoterica, And I guess / That's a break for the American Railway Express,” referring to the notorious obscenity trials over James Joyce’s Ulysses that had been going on since 1922 and were finally settled in 1933.

alfinyalcabo
24-03-2017, 05:48 PM
plural noun
1. things understood by or meant for a select few; recondite matters or items.
2. curiosa.

Quotes
At the G20 he was in his element—an instinctively global leader wading through esoterica that most people couldn't grasp, taking charge by dint of his superior knowledge.
--*"Why Gordon Brown Struggles So Mightily," Newsweek, June 11, 2009

When Dan Brown unleashed The Da Vinci Code in 2003 ... he was simply bringing this obsession with esoterica into the mainstream.
--*Frances Stonor Saunders,*"Leonardo da Vinci: the myth and the man," The Guardian, October 21, 2011


Origin
Esoterica is a noun derived from the Greek adjective esōterikós “belonging to the initiate, inner, esoteric.” Esōterikós has a distinguished history in ancient Greek philosophical systems (Pythagorean, Aristotelian, Stoic). Esoterica, if not coined by Ogden Nash (1902–71), was popularized by him in a poem of his published in The New Yorker in 1930. The poem contains the line “The postal authorities of the United States of America Frown on Curiosa, Erotica and Esoterica, And I guess / That's a break for the American Railway Express,” referring to the notorious obscenity trials over James Joyce’s Ulysses that had been going on since 1922 and were finally settled in 1933.

Whats this ? Guess the word? Lol

Altobelli
24-03-2017, 05:51 PM
You caught me before I edited it :)

Altobelli
24-03-2017, 05:52 PM
Whats this ? Guess the word? Lol

Now that would be a good thread if done properly alf......

alfinyalcabo
24-03-2017, 06:00 PM
Now that would be a good thread if done properly alf......

yes it would,don't forget yo do your predictions as well. :D

Altobelli
24-03-2017, 06:03 PM
Good job you reminded me as I would not have time tomorrow.

Altobelli
25-03-2017, 04:10 PM
COTERMINOUS adjective (koh-tur-muh-nuh s)

adjective
1. having the same border or covering the same area.
2. being the same in extent; coextensive in range or scope.

Quotes

They would reach the city of Gugs--which is coterminous with the whole kingdom--through the proper burrows, emerging in a cemetery not far from the stair-containing Tower of Koth.
--*H. P. Lovecraft (1890–1937),*The Dream Quest of Unknown Kadath, 1943

The estate of Dale of Allington had been coterminous, with the parish of Allington for some hundreds of years ...
--*Anthony Trollope,*The Small House at Allington, 1864


Origin

Coterminous came to English in the late 1700s. It is a reformation of the earlier adjective conterminous.

Balanbam00
26-03-2017, 03:49 AM
Thalassophile


. A lover of the sea, someone who loves the sea/ocean.

Altobelli
26-03-2017, 03:30 PM
OROGENY noun (aw-roj-uh-nee)

noun
1. Geology. the process of mountain making or upheaval. Also called orogenesis.

Quotes

Ogden Tweto, the foremost expert on the Laramide orogeny believes the New Rockies began to emerge 72,000,000 years ago, with the process terminating about 43,000,000 years ago.
--*James A. Michener,*Centennial, 1974

The southern mountain range, like the one at the lower tip of the peninsula which was folded during the same orogeny, was a refuge for the flora and fauna of a continent during the Ice Age.
--*Jean M. Auel,*The Clan of the Cave Bear, 1980


Origin

The -geny of orogeny is easy to recognize and common, meaning “production, formation,” related to genesis, another Greek noun. The oro- part is not as common or its meaning so obvious. It comes from the Greek noun óros (stem ore-) “mountain, hill,” from a complicated Proto-Indo-European root er-, or-, r- (with other variants) "to move, rise, excite." This root is the source of English are (of the verb to be), and the Latin verb orīrī “to arise, be born,” which has the present participle stem orient- “rising, rising sun, east.” Orogeny entered English in the 19th century.

Altobelli
27-03-2017, 06:57 PM
MUMPSIMUS noun (muhmp-suh-muh s)

noun
1. adherence to or persistence in an erroneous use of language, memorization, practice, belief, etc., out of habit or obstinacy (opposed to sumpsimus).
2. a person who persists in a mistaken expression or practice (opposed to sumpsimus).

Quotes

Another misnomer in which the news media perseverate is "Fighting Irish." Surely that must be a prime example of mumpsimus, the pig-headed persistence in error.
--*Leon C. Chesley,*"Vocabulary Test for Football," New York Times, November 28, 1993

To qualify for keen enjoyment of Naming Day in Eden, by Noah Jonathan Jacobs, you should be dictionary lover .... You should relish such stories as that of the medieval monk who, having said "mumpsimus" instead of "sumpsimus," insisted that he liked "mumpsimus" better and would continue to say it.
--*John T. Frederick,*"Speaking of Books," The Rotarian, December 1958


Origin

Mumpsimus entered English from a story, which perhaps originated with Erasmus, of an illiterate priest who said mumpsimus rather than sūmpsimus (1st plural perfect indicative of Latin sūmere to pick up) while reciting the liturgy, and refused to change the word when corrected.

Altobelli
28-03-2017, 05:29 PM
COZE noun (kohz)

noun
1. a friendly talk; a chat.
verb
1. to converse in a friendly way; chat.

Quotes

Miss Crawford appeared gratified by the application, and after a moment's thought, urged Fanny's returning with her in a much more cordial manner than before, and proposed their going up into her room, where they might have a comfortable coze ...
--*Jane Austen,*Mansfield Park, 1814

... he hopes, perhaps, for a walk with Miss Charlotte, or a coze in Madame Smolensk's little private room.
--*William Makepeace Thackeray,*The Adventures of Philip on His Way Through the World Shewing Who Robbed Him, Who Helped Him, and Who Passed Him By, 1861–62


Origin

Coze came to English in the 1820s from French causer “to chat,” from Old French “to reason, expound.” Ultimately coze derives from Latin causārī “to plead a cause, plead as an excuse.”

Altobelli
29-03-2017, 01:57 PM
VULPINE adjective (vuhl-pahyn)

adjective
1. of or resembling a fox.
2. cunning or crafty.

Quotes

[Roald] Dahl’s vulpine hero is a beast of operatic dimensions—in his battle to save his family from such pernicious adversaries as Farmer Bunce he loses his enviable tail—and Scarfe has made him even more dashing.
--*Emily Nunn,*"Slyboots," The New Yorker, November 16, 1998

Her immense gray eyes looked vulpine and northerly, as if I should see snowdrifts reflected in them.
--*Sabina Murray,*A Carnivore's Inquiry, 2004


Origin

Vulpine comes from Latin vulpīnus, an adjective derived from vulpēs “fox.” The Latin noun also has the sense “cunning, crafty person.” Vulpēs is related to Greek alṓpēx and alōpós “fox” and less clearly to other Indo-European languages (taboo forms for wolf and fox are common in ancient Indo-European languages). Vulpine entered English in the 17th century.

Altobelli
30-03-2017, 03:59 PM
NESCIENCE noun (nesh-uh-ns)

noun
1. lack of knowledge; ignorance.
2. agnosticism.

Quotes

"It seems to me," cried the other, "that I must repeatedly raise my voice in opposition to a proposal that is redolent of most unprofessional malice or else nescience ..."
--*Anthony Burgess,*Napoleon Symphony, 1974

... quiz shows merely expose our appalling national nescience.
--*David L. Delman,*"To the Radio Editor," New York Times, July 18, 1948


Origin

Nescience comes from Late Latin nescientia “ignorance, unawareness,” which is probably a neologism coined by the Christian monk, philosopher, and theologian Claudianus Mamertus, who died about 432. Nescientia derives from nescient-, the stem of nesciēns, present participle of nescīre “to be ignorant, not to know.” The “positive” verb scīre “to know” is the source of English “science.” Nescience entered English in the 17th century.

Altobelli
31-03-2017, 04:26 PM
WELTSCHMERZ noun (velt-shmerts)

noun

1. German. sorrow that one feels and accepts as one's necessary portion in life; sentimental pessimism.

Quotes

Weltschmerz, the philosophy of the "world-woe," was at its height. Gloomy theology and pessimistic philosophy reigned.
--*"The Sorrows of Werther," New York Times, September 21, 1910

Cohen confused his mood with his chronic weltschmerz. He spoke at great length on the vicissitudes of a sensitive spirit, his dissatisfaction, the inadequacy of this sphere as far as he was concerned.
--*Daniel Fuchs,*Summer in Williamsburg, 1934


Origin

Weltschmerz comes from German Welt “world” and Schmerz “pain” (related to English smart “pain”). Weltschmerz is associated with 19th century Romanticism and was coined by the German Romantic writer Jean Paul, the pen name of Jean Paul Friedrich Richter (1763-1825), in his novel Selina (1827). English uses the standard German spelling and the pronunciation of w as v, but English has had the alternative spelling Weltschmertz for about as long a time. Weltschmerz entered English in the 19th century.

Altobelli
01-04-2017, 05:08 PM
PLISKY noun (plis-kee)

noun
1. Scot. and North England. a mischievous trick; practical joke; prank.
adjective
1. Scot. and North England. mischievous; playful.

Quotes

"... Faith! yon was an ill plisky ye played me to brak into my chop an' steal the bonnie leddy."
--*George MacDonald,*Robert Falconer, 1868

"... I would play him sic a plisky as he shouldna forget till his dying day. By the souls o' the Jerdans, I would!"
--*James Hogg,*The Shepherd's Calendar, 1829


Origin

Plisky is a dialect word found chiefly in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and northern England; its origin is uncertain. It entered English in the 18th century.

Altobelli
02-04-2017, 05:44 PM
PLATITUDE noun (plat-I-tood)

noun
1. a flat, dull, or trite remark, especially one uttered as if it were fresh or profound.
2. the quality or state of being flat, dull, or trite: the platitude of most political oratory.

Quotes

One of the most common platitudes we heard was that “words failed.” But words were not failing Teri and me at all.... [We] had plenty of language with which to talk to each other about the horror of what was happening, and talk we did.
--*Aleksandar Hemon,*"The Aquarium," The New Yorker, June 13 & 20, 2011

... he took refuge in the comforting platitude that the first six months were always the most difficult in marriage. "After that I suppose we shall have pretty nearly finished rubbing off each other's angles," he reflected.
--*Edith Wharton,*The Age of Innocence, 1920


Origin

Platitude came to English from the French term literally meaning “flatness.” It entered English in the early 1800s.

SERVERNOTRESPONDING
03-04-2017, 09:52 AM
Me thinks our team are suffering from a bout of kakorrhaphiophobia.

Kakorrhaphiophobia is an abnormal, persistent, irrational fear of failure. In clinical cases, it's debilitating: the fear of even the most subtle failure or defeat is so intense that it restricts a person from doing anything at all

Altobelli
03-04-2017, 03:11 PM
I'd class Brady as suffering at least Server.

Altobelli
03-04-2017, 03:17 PM
AGINNER noun (uh-gin-er)

noun
1. Informal. a person who opposes a plan, proposed legislation, or any drastic change: He won the election by appealing to the aginners.

Quotes

In that prickly family atmosphere, McCormick grew up to be a reflexive ''aginner,'' a man of epic antagonisms, prodigious crotchets and--here his mother was wrong--fixed, taproot convictions impermeable to evidence or reason.
--*David M. Kennedy,*"Whatever It Is, I'm Against It," New York Times, July 13, 1997

It seems as if this country has become an "aginner." Such a policy will end in failure. We have to be for something, but first we must know just what we are for and put it in simple language ...
--*C. W. Brown,*"Re: Package of Freedom," The Rotarian, June 1951


Origin

The humorous phrase “to be agin the government” dates to the late 19th century. Agin is one of the many, many developments of the Middle English preposition again, agains, against, “opposite, toward” (against became the standard form of the preposition in Modern English). The earliest recorded spellings of agin appeared in the 18th century.

Altobelli
04-04-2017, 04:29 PM
CHATOYANT adjective (shue-toi-uh nt)

adjective
1. changing in luster or color: chatoyant silk.
2. Jewelry. reflecting a single streak of light when cut in a cabochon.
noun
1. Jewelry. a cabochon-cut gemstone having this reflected streak, as a chrysoberyl cat's-eye.

Quotes

... at the approach of Easter holidays, when my parents had promised to let me spend them, for once, in the north of Italy, in place of those dreams of tempests ... was substituted in me the contrary dream of the most chatoyant of springs ...
--*Marcel Proust,*In Search of Lost Time, Volume 1: Swann's Way, translated by C. K. Scott Moncrieff, 1922

My mother's astonishing, chatoyant gray eyes could see through solid walls and beyond to the horizon. I had no doubt of that.
--*Anne Rivers Siddons,*Off Season, 2008


Origin

Chatoyant came to English from a special use of the present participle of the French verb chantoyer “to change luster like a cat’s eye.” It entered English in the late 1700s.