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Thread: OT: Notts city & county slang

  1. #21
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    All round Lambley to get to Carlton - You have taken the long route
    All gone like Tommy Seals shovel - It's been stolen

  2. #22
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    Shurrup – Would you please be quiet
    Ghee ovver – Would you please stop
    Taitered – Rather tired
    Wobbie - Wasp

  3. #23
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    Sucker - Ice lolly

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wedgie_pie View Post
    say it to the kids when they hurt themselves
    or when they ott themsens

    It's not just about vocabulary Sid, it's how it's spoken. In Notts case, it's about barely opening your mouth and talking in low tones to make yourself sound hard (and thick).

    I'm not even sure it's a natural accent, people talk in a Notts accent like some kind of club where only those who talk that way are accepted. I came up from Hertfordshire aged 7 and immediately got taken the piss taken for barth, glarss etc so I learned to use the short a very quickly.
    Last edited by Bohinen; 13-06-2018 at 09:19 AM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaughingMagpie View Post
    Don't even go there!

    Cobs are cobs!
    Ahh, the oft used starter for mass office arguments up here in the North East

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Pie View Post
    I was always told to 'dab in' as a child when we were in a rush. Anyone else remember that phrase?
    I still use it. My dad said it a lot and was also fond of telling me to 'wind my neck in' as well.
    I occasionally use 'wind your neck in' and I doubt anyone knows what I'm on about.

  7. #27
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    A lot of them don't register as exclusive to this area because you don't know any different. I mean, "A sucker from the ice cream van", surely everybody calls them that don't they? That's what it is! A sucker! My grandparents used to tell me to "bobbars" if I was playing near the fire or something sharp and they always called the pavement the "corsey", but I thought that was just an old people thing.

  8. #28
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    Some excellent stuff on here. I use Noo-arkese myself - you never say 'new' always noo.
    'There's no accounting for folk'
    There used to be a long distance runner named Pant Chapman who became a local legend, scaring people silly as he came up behind them on his training runs in the dark. 'You sound like Pant'.
    That 'ou' sound (as in County) is pronounced more like 'Carn-tee') In Hull they can't say 'don't know', it comes out as 'durnt nur'
    Another Notts -ism is 'slorming'. My dad was always yelling me off for 'slorming' which basically was performing tired antics on the furniture because you didn't know what to do with yourself.
    Also 'stop go-shee Marlowing' or 'you're just like Go-shee Marlow. Which meant you were hanging around without a clue and getting in the way. Who Go-shee Marlow was I have no idea.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by upthemaggies View Post
    A lot of them don't register as exclusive to this area because you don't know any different. I mean, "A sucker from the ice cream van", surely everybody calls them that don't they? That's what it is! A sucker! My grandparents used to tell me to "bobbars" if I was playing near the fire or something sharp and they always called the pavement the "corsey", but I thought that was just an old people thing.
    I've never heard an ice lolly referred to as a 'sucker' anywhere except Notts.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidders View Post
    That 'ou' sound (as in County) is pronounced more like 'Carn-tee')
    Spelling it "Carn-tee" makes it looks as though it would rhyme with "Barn tea". For Nottingham speak it's hard to convey in letters, the 2nd syllable would be "Eh" with a hard 'E' effectively replacing any hint of a 't' sound. The first part is more like "Can" than "Carn" but with the 'a' sound extended, resonating at the upper back end of the throat, you almost go into a grin to get that part out.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dam617 View Post
    I still use it. My dad said it a lot and was also fond of telling me to 'wind my neck in' as well.
    I occasionally use 'wind your neck in' and I doubt anyone knows what I'm on about.
    Both "dab in" & "wind your neck in" are still used fairly often I think, does anyone else remember when you asked what was for dinner or tea being told "**** with sugar onnit" or was this just a Netho saying ? also the 2 questions that you immediately knew were about football, "did ya goo dahn" or " are ya goowin dahn".

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancientpie View Post
    Both "dab in" & "wind your neck in" are still used fairly often I think, does anyone else remember when you asked what was for dinner or tea being told "**** with sugar onnit" or was this just a Netho saying ? also the 2 questions that you immediately knew were about football, "did ya goo dahn" or " are ya goowin dahn".
    Yep, that reached Noo-ark, as did salad being pig's d*ck with lettuce!

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancientpie View Post
    Both "dab in" & "wind your neck in" are still used fairly often I think, does anyone else remember when you asked what was for dinner or tea being told "**** with sugar onnit" or was this just a Netho saying ? also the 2 questions that you immediately knew were about football, "did ya goo dahn" or " are ya goowin dahn".
    When asked what's fer tea it was a kick at pantry door and a run round table.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancientpie View Post
    does anyone else remember when you asked what was for dinner or tea being told "**** with sugar onnit" or was this just a Netho saying ?
    That was one of my gran's sayings, she originated from Bul'ul, so not just Netho.
    My dad used to refer to the floor as the 'dog shelf', don't know if it's a Nottingham thing though.

  15. #35
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    Don’t know if this is just an old persons saying but my Mum when referring to the time of day does not say 25 past or 25 to, but says 5 & 20 past or 5 & 20 to.

  16. #36
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    Sup up

  17. #37
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    Calling somebody "youth" is Nottingham slang (I think) but it's not heard often now just like serry which was very common even in the 80's

  18. #38
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    Going slightly off topic here I know but when I was at school we had to read a book that may have been by Keith Waterhouse which was set in Nottingham and the goose fair,anyone know which book it was?

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by snipe_pie View Post
    Don’t know if this is just an old persons saying but my Mum when referring to the time of day does not say 25 past or 25 to, but says 5 & 20 past or 5 & 20 to.
    My grandparents used to tell the time like that as well.

    Some others I've thought of.

    A good iding - The wraft from a parent.
    Clip rahnd tab - What you would get off your "mam" or a officer of the law in the olden days for wrong doings.
    Gorwan play on yer own part - Go and play outside your own house.
    Kerby - A game in which you try and bounce a ball off the corner of the pavement being stood in the middle of it.
    I ent done owt - I've not done anything wrong.
    Pill - A game played in school playgrounds where a tennis ball is hit against a wall. Basically squash but involving more people and using your hand instead of a racket.
    Bagsy - Claiming something first.
    Swapsies - When you have surplus stickers for a sticker album and want to exchange them.
    Note - Nothing
    It's a bit Derby Road - (Rhymes with code for cold) as it's cold today
    Der yo live in a barn - If you leave a door open.
    Stop meking a Racket - Stop making all that noise.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAD_MAGPIE View Post
    My grandparents used to tell the time like that as well.

    Some others I've thought of.

    A good iding - The wraft from a parent.
    Clip rahnd tab - What you would get off your "mam" or a officer of the law in the olden days for wrong doings.
    Gorwan play on yer own part - Go and play outside your own house.
    Kerby - A game in which you try and bounce a ball off the corner of the pavement being stood in the middle of it.
    I ent done owt - I've not done anything wrong.
    Pill - A game played in school playgrounds where a tennis ball is hit against a wall. Basically squash but involving more people and using your hand instead of a racket.
    Bagsy - Claiming something first.
    Swapsies - When you have surplus stickers for a sticker album and want to exchange them.
    Note - Nothing
    It's a bit Derby Road - (Rhymes with code for cold) as it's cold today
    Der yo live in a barn - If you leave a door open.
    Stop meking a Racket - Stop making all that noise.
    Some good ones there. We used to play Kerry with two people, one each side of the road on the pavements, had to throw a ball so it bounced back off the other kerb. Funny because we could play that for hours!

    Also, who remembers being called ‘cheeky daft’?

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