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Thread: OT: Notts city & county slang

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAD_MAGPIE View Post
    My grandparents used to tell the time like that as well.

    Some others I've thought of.

    A good iding - The wraft from a parent.
    Clip rahnd tab - What you would get off your "mam" or a officer of the law in the olden days for wrong doings.
    Gorwan play on yer own part - Go and play outside your own house.
    Kerby - A game in which you try and bounce a ball off the corner of the pavement being stood in the middle of it.
    I ent done owt - I've not done anything wrong.
    Pill - A game played in school playgrounds where a tennis ball is hit against a wall. Basically squash but involving more people and using your hand instead of a racket.
    Bagsy - Claiming something first.
    Swapsies - When you have surplus stickers for a sticker album and want to exchange them.
    Note - Nothing
    It's a bit Derby Road - (Rhymes with code for cold) as it's cold today
    Der yo live in a barn - If you leave a door open.
    Stop meking a Racket - Stop making all that noise.
    Great list. Talking of games, what about 'dobby' instead of tag?

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_anticlough View Post
    Great list. Talking of games, what about 'dobby' instead of tag?
    We used to play a game called faggies where you stood fag packets against a wall and skimmed another fag packet to try and knock it over. It was a lot more fun than it sounds

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Pie View Post
    I was always told to 'dab in' as a child when we were in a rush. Anyone else remember that phrase?
    When my Grandma (Nanna) wanted us to hurry up she would say "mekaste" which I thought was a single word until I was a 'grown-up' (is that local?) I was a daft 'apeth. Again I thought that was some sort of primate until I worked out it was short for "Daft halfpenny worth."

    I don't think it was an attempt to be hard or street wise, just efficient.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by sevens_a_secret View Post
    When my Grandma (Nanna) wanted us to hurry up she would say "mekaste" which I thought was a single word until I was a 'grown-up' (is that local?) I was a daft 'apeth. Again I thought that was some sort of primate until I worked out it was short for "Daft halfpenny worth."

    I don't think it was an attempt to be hard or street wise, just efficient.
    Both of those remind me of my Auntie Gladys, who was really my great aunt, who lived in the Medders.

  5. #45
    My grandad (sadly has the curse of dementia) refers to the floor as dog shelf, eating your crusts making your hair curl and refers to my grandma as ower mam. My grandparents who are now in their 90's are in a home. The staff now refer to my grandma as Ower mam. When talking to him. "Just seen ower mam downstairs". Not sure if this is a Notts thing but after 40 years plus it's been the norm in our family.

  6. #46
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    Sucker v Sookeh?
    A sucker was very specific...no ice cream just the iced lolly like the rocket but not a jublee interestingly enough.
    But sookeh...being called sookeh was bad. It meant being a pathetic like state of uselessness with a bit of ' spazziness' thrown in. Very un- PC now...sorry.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by magpiekev View Post
    We used to play a game called faggies where you stood fag packets against a wall and skimmed another fag packet to try and knock it over. It was a lot more fun than it sounds
    We played that too you played against your mates both putting the fag packets against the wall and if you won you kept the lot until the next game you got quite skillful at skimming other flattened packets at them .

    Living near chilwell golf course we used to call them the Gollies

    Another saying from my aunties were I'll guto the foot of ow stairs.{when told of something that surprised them}

    If you upset one of my aunties she would say I'll gi yo dam good cut.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_anticlough View Post
    Great list. Talking of games, what about 'dobby' instead of tag?
    Yes, but it was dob-eh, sometimes off-ground (being off ground saved you from being dobbed), and hot rice where someone who was 'on' lobbed a tennis ball trying to hit people below the knee.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by since41 View Post
    We played that too you played against your mates both putting the fag packets against the wall and if you won you kept the lot until the next game you got quite skillful at skimming other flattened packets at them .
    Jesus, that was a rough school. We played that with football cards in Lady Bay.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bohinen View Post
    Jesus, that was a rough school. We played that with football cards in Lady Bay.
    They were collectors items senior service 555 with a red band across was the prize possession I seem to remember .
    We didn't have much money them days but they were good uns

    We used to scour the streets for throw aways.

  11. #51
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    Dont know if this is a Sutton saying but as a kid, if I left the door open letting in the cold my Dad would ask do you come from Warsop? Apparently folk from there leave doors open 😆😆

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by snipe_pie View Post
    Don’t know if this is a Sutton saying but as a kid, if I left the door open letting in the cold my Dad would ask “ do you come from Warsop?” Apparently folk from there leave doors open ����
    Thought Warsop was Wassup in Mansfield, Snipe?

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by cocopops61 View Post
    Going slightly off topic here I know but when I was at school we had to read a book that may have been by Keith Waterhouse which was set in Nottingham and the goose fair,anyone know which book it was?
    Keith Waterhouse's 'There is a Happy Land' is a classic kids story but set round Leeds & Wakefield. I think you may be confusing it with Alan Sillitoe's short stories collected under 'The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner'. Although set in the 40's and 50's, these convey Nottingham as it was then in terms of language and events. One story is based around a match between Notts and Bristol City -I think it's called 'The Match'.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidders View Post
    Thought Warsop was Wassup in Mansfield, Snipe?
    Its actually Waaaaaaaarsop Sidders 👍😁😆

  15. #55
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    On my way to join the Navy ( September 79 ) , a lad came up to me on the train after hearing me talking ' a up yoth ,yo from noternum '. Never thought I had much of an accent until then.

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by sevens_a_secret View Post
    When my Grandma (Nanna) wanted us to hurry up she would say "mekaste" which I thought was a single word until I was a 'grown-up' (is that local?) I was a daft 'apeth. Again I thought that was some sort of primate until I worked out it was short for "Daft halfpenny worth."

    I don't think it was an attempt to be hard or street wise, just efficient.
    Mekaste is certainly a good one for wanting someone to hurry up. Heard that many times.

    Here's a few others;

    Supping - Usually referred to when people are drinking alcohol. "E spends all is time dahn the pub supping"
    Corporation - Name for the Local Nottingham green/cream buses (when they used to all be just that colour)

    Place names albeit it's more how they are pronounced rather than slang;

    Slab Square - The Old Market Square in front of the Council House
    Suvvull - Southwell
    Aspleh - Aspley
    Mapleh - Mapperley
    Strelleh - Strelley
    Top Valleh - Top Valley
    Baseferd - Basford (non locals sometimes pronounce it Bass ford.)
    Bull wool - Bulwell
    Uck null - Hucknall
    Broxster - Broxtowe
    Kimburleh - Kimberley
    Rnulled - Arnold
    Besswood - Bestwood
    Last edited by MAD_MAGPIE; 14-06-2018 at 11:59 AM.

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by youstylishmagpies View Post
    My grandad (sadly has the curse of dementia) refers to the floor as dog shelf, eating your crusts making your hair curl
    Yep I remember both of those too. I still call the floor the dog shelf myself!

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elite_Pie View Post
    I was always told to 'dab in' as a child when we were in a rush. Anyone else remember that phrase?
    Yep, we used to say that as an alternative to telling someone to gerronwi'it

  19. #59
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    The Macc Lads (Macclesfield) had a song that included the line "Sup up lad, I've spilt more ale down me waistcoat than you've supped tonight." A lot of the words and phrases mentioned will probably be used in South Yorkshire and into the North-West as far as Manchester.

  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by upthemaggies View Post
    The Macc Lads (Macclesfield) had a song that included the line "Sup up lad, I've spilt more ale down me waistcoat than you've supped tonight." A lot of the words and phrases mentioned will probably be used in South Yorkshire and into the North-West as far as Manchester.
    Well she wears big knickers an' works on't sewage farm, put me 'and down 'er jeans an' nearly lost 'alf me arm . . . Sweaty Betty!

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