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Thread: Interesting rule in the La Liga play-offs

  1. #1
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    Interesting rule in the La Liga play-offs

    As you may already know, the Spanish football league has a similar play-off system as the English one, but I didn't realise until I watched one of the play-off matches the other day that they have a different rule if the match ends in a draw over two legs.

    The English play-offs see drawn matches decided on penalties, which never seems a satisfactory way to decide a team's entire season. In Spain though, if it's a draw on aggregate, the team that finished highest in the regular season is declared the winner. To me, that seems a much fairer and better system.

    Anybody else agree?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackal2 View Post
    As you may already know, the Spanish football league has a similar play-off system as the English one, but I didn't realise until I watched one of the play-off matches the other day that they have a different rule if the match ends in a draw over two legs.

    The English play-offs see drawn matches decided on penalties, which never seems a satisfactory way to decide a team's entire season. In Spain though, if it's a draw on aggregate, the team that finished highest in the regular season is declared the winner. To me, that seems a much fairer and better system.

    Anybody else agree?
    Yep, if you finished higher than your opponent just park the bus!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncfcog View Post
    Yep, if you finished higher than your opponent just park the bus!
    That would be the potential downside, although I've not seen any evidence of it happening in the games I've seen. The semi-finals between Albacete and Mallorca, and Deportivo La Coruna and Malaga were all good ties with both teams playing to win.

  4. #4
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    They do it in Serie B in Italy too and yep it is a good rule.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jackal2 View Post
    As you may already know, the Spanish football league has a similar play-off system as the English one, but I didn't realise until I watched one of the play-off matches the other day that they have a different rule if the match ends in a draw over two legs.

    The English play-offs see drawn matches decided on penalties, which never seems a satisfactory way to decide a team's entire season. In Spain though, if it's a draw on aggregate, the team that finished highest in the regular season is declared the winner. To me, that seems a much fairer and better system.

    Anybody else agree?
    Yes a whole season should never come down to one penalty !

  6. #6
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    Wonít affect Notts though, they donít have two leg playoffs in National League

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2piesonmyshirt View Post
    Wonít affect Notts though, they donít have two leg playoffs in National League
    Looks like we don't have a leg to stand on then

  8. #8
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    Yeah I like it.

    My mate has currently been saying that English football should introduce 0 points for each team for a 0-0 draw.....another good rule I reck. Will stop all these horribly defensive teams and make stuff more exciting.

  9. #9
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    A point for every goal scored

  10. #10
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    I agree that penalties is a cruel way to settle a game, let alone a season. Then again, penalty shootouts bring a level of tension and despair/joy that makes football what it is. The heartbreaking shootouts that I've watched remained etched in my memory, as do the ones we've won. All of them seem pretty epic, looking back.

    Speaking of different rules, in the Czech Republic, the division is split into a mini leagues for the last part of the season. So all championship contenders play each other once, as do all relegation contenders. Points continue on from the main portion of the season though. Also, the team finishing just above the 'automatic' relegation spot plays a playoff against a team finishing just below the automatic promotion spot in the division below - a sort of cross-divisional playoff.
    Last edited by slack_pie; 21-06-2019 at 03:54 AM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by slack_pie View Post
    I agree that penalties is a cruel way to settle a game, let alone a season. Then again, penalty shootouts bring a level of tension and despair/joy that makes football what it is. The heartbreaking shootouts that I've watched remained etched in my memory, as do the ones we've won. All of them seem pretty epic, looking back.

    Speaking of different rules, in the Czech Republic, the division is split into a mini leagues for the last part of the season. So all championship contenders play each other once, as do all relegation contenders. Points continue on from the main portion of the season though. Also, the team finishing just above the 'automatic' relegation spot plays a playoff against a team finishing just below the automatic promotion spot in the division below - a sort of cross-divisional playoff.
    Sounds virtually identical to the Scottish Premier League/Football league system.

    I must admit, I do have a bit of a problem with countries who run football league systems that rely on small divisions with teams playing each other up to four times, or splitting into championship and relegation groups. Generally speaking, I think these leagues are more lightly regarded, compared with those countries that have leagues of 18, 20 or 22 teams.

    If I was running the Scottish Premier/Football League I would return to the days of having two divisions rather than four, which I think is a stronger look. This has been suggested, but apparently some Scottish Premier league teams don't want to give up having two cash bonanza home games per season against both Celtic and Rangers. I think that's a short-sighted view and the Scottish Premier League/Football League in its current format looks tacky.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackal2 View Post
    Sounds virtually identical to the Scottish Premier League/Football league system.

    I must admit, I do have a bit of a problem with countries who run football league systems that rely on small divisions with teams playing each other up to four times, or splitting into championship and relegation groups. Generally speaking, I think these leagues are more lightly regarded, compared with those countries that have leagues of 18, 20 or 22 teams.

    If I was running the Scottish Premier/Football League I would return to the days of having two divisions rather than four, which I think is a stronger look. This has been suggested, but apparently some Scottish Premier league teams don't want to give up having two cash bonanza home games per season against both Celtic and Rangers. I think that's a short-sighted view and the Scottish Premier League/Football League in its current format looks tacky.
    I agree. Actually, the Czech league is kind of similar to the Scottish league in that there are two 'big' teams that could probably compete in the second tier of English football, while the rest of the teams are rubbish, hardly have any fans, and zero chance of winning anything. The only difference here is that the two 'big' teams are nowhere near as big as Celtic and Rangers.

    Czech football is a joke though. Last season, Dukla Prague got an average attendance of under 3000 in the top division. And that is distorted by the two big games against Sparta and Slavia. It's crazy. Makes you realise how special football is in England, where fifth-tier teams get similar attendances to that.

  13. #13
    The Spanish League is a true pyramid, unlike the English system which claims to be a pyramid, but is actually structured more in the shape of a church steeple. There is one league at the top level (La Liga), one league at the second level (Segunda), four at the third level (Segunda. B ) and 18 at the fourth level (Tercera). That covers the top 480 clubs in Spain.

    There is no automatic promotion from the Tercera to Segunda B. The 18 clubs which won the respective championships, play one game against each other, the winners go up, but the losers get a second chance in further playoffs against the second, third and fourth clubs in each league. Simple it ain’t. The playoffs carry on till the end of June. Anyone wanting full details can look on lapreferente.com - a comprehensive website which covers Spanish football at every level.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by slack_pie View Post
    I agree. Actually, the Czech league is kind of similar to the Scottish league in that there are two 'big' teams that could probably compete in the second tier of English football, while the rest of the teams are rubbish, hardly have any fans, and zero chance of winning anything. The only difference here is that the two 'big' teams are nowhere near as big as Celtic and Rangers.

    Czech football is a joke though. Last season, Dukla Prague got an average attendance of under 3000 in the top division. And that is distorted by the two big games against Sparta and Slavia. It's crazy. Makes you realise how special football is in England, where fifth-tier teams get similar attendances to that.
    I always thought of Sparta and Slavia being the big two, but I notice Viktoria Pilsen seem to have 'emerged' as contenders in recent years. Is that due to a rich investor or just very good management? Or because the big two keep having to sell their best players abroad?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackal2 View Post
    I always thought of Sparta and Slavia being the big two, but I notice Viktoria Pilsen seem to have 'emerged' as contenders in recent years. Is that due to a rich investor or just very good management? Or because the big two keep having to sell their best players abroad?
    Yeah, you are right, but I'm not 100% sure what's behind Plzen's recent success. I don't know about any rich backers, but I don't really keep up with the footy news much here. I know that Slavia have rich Chinese backers, and Sparta have fallen behind them for the time being.

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