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Thread: So Lack of Activity in transfer market & Westminster in disarray.

  1. #1
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    Oct 2010
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    So Lack of Activity in transfer market & Westminster in disarray.

    Been reading a detailed report by Dr Bill Gerrard of Leeds University, for the Economic Observatory. [He's a Professor, specialist in Methodology; Business Analytics; Sports Analytics; Sports Economics]. Professor Bill has worked with a number of elite sports teams around the world. He's been technical analyst for Saracens & London Irish & works analytics in the Dutch Eredivisie PL but is probably best known as the subject featured in the book/film Moneyball.

    Summary of his points.

    1. Brexit ended the free movement of labour between the UK & EU so it represents a reversal of the football Bosman ruling. Clubs wishing to sign foreign players must now apply for a work permit, irrespective of whether these players are moving from EU or non-EU clubs. Work permits are awarded on a points-based system now in UK.

    So any player who has played in at least 70% of their national team games over the previous 12 months will be automatically awarded a work permit. This is however conditional on their national team being ranked in the top 50 worldwide with the minimum appearance requirement falling to 30% if the national team ranks in the top 10 worldwide.

    Points are also awarded for players based on appearance rates for their clubs in both domestic & continental tournaments as well as the success of their clubs.

    2. In addition to this PL clubs now face restrictions on the signing of young foreign players. Clubs are no longer able to sign any foreign players under the age of 18 in a given year & are limited to signing a maximum of 6 foreign players under the age of 21.

    But in relation to the abolition of transfer fees for out-of-contract players, Brexit has had no direct impact. This aspect of the Bosman ruling is now well enshrined in the transfer rules of football’s national & international governing bodies with no realistic prospect or incentive for PL clubs to seek to reverse the position.

    3. As we begin to return to a post-pandemic normality revenues will recover, PL clubs will again become active in the global labour-market for players. But their player development and recruitment strategies will change as a consequence of Brexit & the financial repercussions of Covid 19.

    Clubs now will be forced to focus exclusively on home-grown talent up to the age of 18 and they will no longer be able to recruit 16 &17 year olds from the EU. They will also have to be more selective in the 18-21 age group. Further, Leeds as many other PL clubs will find it more difficult to take a chance on players from low-ranked nations now.



    Conclusion for Leeds - my take on matters ?

    Ramifications of Brexit have made the path to employing non-UK players more restrictive. It has become even more financially & practically attractive to produce first team players from the academies. In turn these academy graduates will be more valuable to sell & 'if good enough' for the first team squad will mean fewer recruitment resources will need to be employed for buying overseas players and avoid navigating more possible difficult employment restrictions.

    For better or worse some of the Brexit changes both hoped for & feared are beginning to take shape & explains precisely Rad's perspective over his Leeds Utd plan & his current difficulty in securing transfers in this 2022 Jan window - he's obviously securing what we have in-house presently regardless, as for the future ?

    Conclusion for me personally ?

    Like many, my memory of morning 24th June 2016 when I woke up in a Psychiatric Hospital to find out the result of the EU Referendum is still raw for me. It was like being punched in the stomach. I remember not believing it was real, the pain, the anger, the bitterness & tears. I also took the decision by the UK to exit the EU as a betrayal. I am the daughter of a European idealist & I’ve always firmly believed in a united and coherent Europe, my family-history demands this inherent stance.

    Now, like many British exiles [15,000 in Brittany-region of France where I live] we can now all watch the shenanigans in Westminster from the comfort of our sofas in Europe - it's as if we're all watching those old BBC tv series House of Cards & Yes Minister, pretty embarrassing really to have a English accent currently in Europe, very sad state of affairs of which I sincerely hope my team can rise above all - as they're my last family-loyalty link to a country I was born in.

    Hopefully another easy ER season-ticket renewal decision but without Rad, MB & political issues in UK dragging on maybe seriously time to re-consider.

    Just saying like - gives you folks a read & Andy the chance to count all my words via his abacus.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monaco_Totty View Post
    Been reading a detailed report by Dr Bill Gerrard of Leeds University, for the Economic Observatory. [He's a Professor, specialist in Methodology; Business Analytics; Sports Analytics; Sports Economics]. Professor Bill has worked with a number of elite sports teams around the world. He's been technical analyst for Saracens & London Irish & works analytics in the Dutch Eredivisie PL but is probably best known as the subject featured in the book/film Moneyball.

    Summary of his points.

    1. Brexit ended the free movement of labour between the UK & EU so it represents a reversal of the football Bosman ruling. Clubs wishing to sign foreign players must now apply for a work permit, irrespective of whether these players are moving from EU or non-EU clubs. Work permits are awarded on a points-based system now in UK.

    So any player who has played in at least 70% of their national team games over the previous 12 months will be automatically awarded a work permit. This is however conditional on their national team being ranked in the top 50 worldwide with the minimum appearance requirement falling to 30% if the national team ranks in the top 10 worldwide.

    Points are also awarded for players based on appearance rates for their clubs in both domestic & continental tournaments as well as the success of their clubs.

    2. In addition to this PL clubs now face restrictions on the signing of young foreign players. Clubs are no longer able to sign any foreign players under the age of 18 in a given year & are limited to signing a maximum of 6 foreign players under the age of 21.

    But in relation to the abolition of transfer fees for out-of-contract players, Brexit has had no direct impact. This aspect of the Bosman ruling is now well enshrined in the transfer rules of football’s national & international governing bodies with no realistic prospect or incentive for PL clubs to seek to reverse the position.

    3. As we begin to return to a post-pandemic normality revenues will recover, PL clubs will again become active in the global labour-market for players. But their player development and recruitment strategies will change as a consequence of Brexit & the financial repercussions of Covid 19.

    Clubs now will be forced to focus exclusively on home-grown talent up to the age of 18 and they will no longer be able to recruit 16 &17 year olds from the EU. They will also have to be more selective in the 18-21 age group. Further, Leeds as many other PL clubs will find it more difficult to take a chance on players from low-ranked nations now.



    Conclusion for Leeds - my take on matters ?

    Ramifications of Brexit have made the path to employing non-UK players more restrictive. It has become even more financially & practically attractive to produce first team players from the academies. In turn these academy graduates will be more valuable to sell & 'if good enough' for the first team squad will mean fewer recruitment resources will need to be employed for buying overseas players and avoid navigating more possible difficult employment restrictions.

    For better or worse some of the Brexit changes both hoped for & feared are beginning to take shape & explains precisely Rad's perspective over his Leeds Utd plan & his current difficulty in securing transfers in this 2022 Jan window - he's obviously securing what we have in-house presently regardless, as for the future ?

    Conclusion for me personally ?

    Like many, my memory of morning 24th June 2016 when I woke up in a Psychiatric Hospital to find out the result of the EU Referendum is still raw for me. It was like being punched in the stomach. I remember not believing it was real, the pain, the anger, the bitterness & tears. I also took the decision by the UK to exit the EU as a betrayal. I am the daughter of a European idealist & I’ve always firmly believed in a united and coherent Europe, my family-history demands this inherent stance.

    Now, like many British exiles [15,000 in Brittany-region of France where I live] we can now all watch the shenanigans in Westminster from the comfort of our sofas in Europe - it's as if we're all watching those old BBC tv series House of Cards & Yes Minister, pretty embarrassing really to have a English accent currently in Europe, very sad state of affairs of which I sincerely hope my team can rise above all - as they're my last family-loyalty link to a country I was born in.

    Hopefully another easy ER season-ticket renewal decision but without Rad, MB & political issues in UK dragging on maybe seriously time to re-consider.

    Just saying like - gives you folks a read & Andy the chance to count all my words via his abacus.
    Firstly what's happening in Westminster has f00k all to do with Brexit.

    Secondly, the "shenanigans" here àre nothing compared to the activities of the yellow-jackets in your beloved France.

    Thirdly, the results of Brexit may have been "like being punched in the stomach" for you, but for those of us who live on this sceptered isle, it was the starting gun for a process by which we take back (and it will take time) control of whole swathes of our lives surrendered to unelected bureaucrats who spend their entire lives in transit between Brussels and Strasbourg and equally in transit between one hair-brained scheme and another (driven in most part by the rural backwater communities who have little or no concept of how the 21st century operates, a little like those in the Commission).

    And let's not forget about that champion of European democracy Mr Macron, who makes Boris look half way competent.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monaco_Totty View Post
    Been reading a detailed report by Dr Bill Gerrard of Leeds University, for the Economic Observatory. [He's a Professor, specialist in Methodology; Business Analytics; Sports Analytics; Sports Economics]. Professor Bill has worked with a number of elite sports teams around the world. He's been technical analyst for Saracens & London Irish & works analytics in the Dutch Eredivisie PL but is probably best known as the subject featured in the book/film Moneyball.

    Summary of his points.

    1. Brexit ended the free movement of labour between the UK & EU so it represents a reversal of the football Bosman ruling. Clubs wishing to sign foreign players must now apply for a work permit, irrespective of whether these players are moving from EU or non-EU clubs. Work permits are awarded on a points-based system now in UK.

    So any player who has played in at least 70% of their national team games over the previous 12 months will be automatically awarded a work permit. This is however conditional on their national team being ranked in the top 50 worldwide with the minimum appearance requirement falling to 30% if the national team ranks in the top 10 worldwide.

    Points are also awarded for players based on appearance rates for their clubs in both domestic & continental tournaments as well as the success of their clubs.

    2. In addition to this PL clubs now face restrictions on the signing of young foreign players. Clubs are no longer able to sign any foreign players under the age of 18 in a given year & are limited to signing a maximum of 6 foreign players under the age of 21.

    But in relation to the abolition of transfer fees for out-of-contract players, Brexit has had no direct impact. This aspect of the Bosman ruling is now well enshrined in the transfer rules of football’s national & international governing bodies with no realistic prospect or incentive for PL clubs to seek to reverse the position.

    3. As we begin to return to a post-pandemic normality revenues will recover, PL clubs will again become active in the global labour-market for players. But their player development and recruitment strategies will change as a consequence of Brexit & the financial repercussions of Covid 19.

    Clubs now will be forced to focus exclusively on home-grown talent up to the age of 18 and they will no longer be able to recruit 16 &17 year olds from the EU. They will also have to be more selective in the 18-21 age group. Further, Leeds as many other PL clubs will find it more difficult to take a chance on players from low-ranked nations now.



    Conclusion for Leeds - my take on matters ?

    Ramifications of Brexit have made the path to employing non-UK players more restrictive. It has become even more financially & practically attractive to produce first team players from the academies. In turn these academy graduates will be more valuable to sell & 'if good enough' for the first team squad will mean fewer recruitment resources will need to be employed for buying overseas players and avoid navigating more possible difficult employment restrictions.

    For better or worse some of the Brexit changes both hoped for & feared are beginning to take shape & explains precisely Rad's perspective over his Leeds Utd plan & his current difficulty in securing transfers in this 2022 Jan window - he's obviously securing what we have in-house presently regardless, as for the future ?

    Conclusion for me personally ?

    Like many, my memory of morning 24th June 2016 when I woke up in a Psychiatric Hospital to find out the result of the EU Referendum is still raw for me. It was like being punched in the stomach. I remember not believing it was real, the pain, the anger, the bitterness & tears. I also took the decision by the UK to exit the EU as a betrayal. I am the daughter of a European idealist & I’ve always firmly believed in a united and coherent Europe, my family-history demands this inherent stance.

    Now, like many British exiles [15,000 in Brittany-region of France where I live] we can now all watch the shenanigans in Westminster from the comfort of our sofas in Europe - it's as if we're all watching those old BBC tv series House of Cards & Yes Minister, pretty embarrassing really to have a English accent currently in Europe, very sad state of affairs of which I sincerely hope my team can rise above all - as they're my last family-loyalty link to a country I was born in.

    Hopefully another easy ER season-ticket renewal decision but without Rad, MB & political issues in UK dragging on maybe seriously time to re-consider.

    Just saying like - gives you folks a read & Andy the chance to count all my words via his abacus.
    And also, you and all the other ex-pats who live "en France" are not "exiles", you are economic migrants, just like the vast majority of those who enjoy taking day trips from Dunkirk, Calais etc across the channel in little boats

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by WTF11 View Post
    And also, you and all the other ex-pats who live "en France" are not "exiles", you are economic migrants, just like the vast majority of those who enjoy taking day trips from Dunkirk, Calais etc across the channel in little boats
    And who, are you may I ask again ?

    Unlike refugees who cannot safely return home, migrants can return home if they wish. This distinction is important for governments, since countries handle migrants under their own immigration laws and processes.

    Dr Gerrard is a forum member by the way & he like myself doesn't hide behind anonymity passing opinion.

    But free speech is a right but I don't agree with you on your point offered - Good evening, whoever you are.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monaco_Totty View Post
    And who, are you may I ask again ?

    Unlike refugees who cannot safely return home, migrants can return home if they wish. This distinction is important for governments, since countries handle migrants under their own immigration laws and processes.

    Dr Gerrard is a forum member by the way & he like myself doesn't hide behind anonymity passing opinion.

    But free speech is a right but I don't agree with you on your point offered - Good evening, whoever you are.
    And if what relevance is the "who are you" question? I'm someone who is a registered member of Footymad, just like you and many others, no more, no less and mire than that isn't something I (or many others) wish to divulge. You would suggest that those who post under such conditions shouldn't, that their contribution on whatever topic should be censored, ignored, subject to other sanction? So much for your supposed support for free speech.

    You use the terms "exile", "refugee" and "migrant" interchangeably, yet they are (as yiu ackniwledge" very different, so which is it? In your post where you describe the vote in leaving the EU was "like being punched in the stomach" you're an exile, or are you a migrant? You're not a refugee, neither are you an exile, and if you're a migrant, you are where you are by choice, live with it and allow those who choose to live here to do so without sniping from those who sought the greener grass on the other side.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monaco_Totty View Post
    And who, are you may I ask again ?

    Unlike refugees who cannot safely return home, migrants can return home if they wish. This distinction is important for governments, since countries handle migrants under their own immigration laws and processes.

    Dr Gerrard is a forum member by the way & he like myself doesn't hide behind anonymity passing opinion.

    But free speech is a right but I don't agree with you on your point offered - Good evening, whoever you are.
    And what exactly is driving your desire to know who I am? Do you ask Whitestomper, or Denver11, or George Kaplan, or Rev72 "who are you?". I think not, so is the query reserved for those who don't agree with you?

    I'm a tad more even-handed. Anonymous or not doesn't matter when it comes to anyone posting here, what matters is the content of the post.

  7. #7
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    This is a tough issue. Both for football and for the country.

    I think I have to address the Brexit issue first. As a yank I never understood why you gave up your sovereignty and turned it over to an unelected bunch of bureaucrats in Brussels. It can benefit the strongest of the countries in this consortium of which the Brits are one of them. all you do it subsidize the weak countries. The "ease of moving around" seems to be more than offset by ending up supporting countries that refuse to run themselves properly. Those countries weren't willing to do what was necessary to get their finances in order. Adding a centralized command and control always means that someone gives up control and turns it over to another board in another country. Just my two cents.

    However, If it does indeed play out and you tighten up the borders to commerce to some degree it would seem to benefit teams that develop their own players. Leeds seems to be pretty good at that. It's a longer term outlook but would seem to add some parity to the EPL?

  8. #8
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    I agree 100% with WTF on all his posts. Just to add he is who he says he is, a straight shooter and pulls no punches.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WTF11 View Post
    And if what relevance is the "who are you" question? I'm someone who is a registered member of Footymad, just like you and many others, no more, no less and mire than that isn't something I (or many others) wish to divulge. You would suggest that those who post under such conditions shouldn't, that their contribution on whatever topic should be censored, ignored, subject to other sanction? So much for your supposed support for free speech.

    You use the terms "exile", "refugee" and "migrant" interchangeably, yet they are (as yiu ackniwledge" very different, so which is it? In your post where you describe the vote in leaving the EU was "like being punched in the stomach" you're an exile, or are you a migrant? You're not a refugee, neither are you an exile, and if you're a migrant, you are where you are by choice, live with it and allow those who choose to live here to do so without sniping from those who sought the greener grass on the other side.


    People undertaking a loss of civil liberties role in society may be forced into exile due to threat, persecution or a host of reason.

    I chose to live in comfortable exile and as such am a social exile, one of many people who have been excluded from the mainstream society. In my case Sectioned twice by English law with a wrong diagnosis, had forced medication forced into me, left addicted to it, discharged on second legal Court hearing appeal, left labelled UK vulnerable adult, unemployable, no Mental Health support & no future. Luckily awarded some damages out of court. Suppose I'm lucky.

    An asylum seeker is someone who claims to be a refugee but whose claim hasn't been evaluated. Someone is an asylum seeker for so long as their application is pending. So not every asylum seeker will be recognised as a refugee, but every refugee is initially an asylum seeker.

    Both my parents came from parents lineage forced to leave countries of birth. Race, Ethnicity & Religious hostile persecution was a common link, sadly. They'll say they're lucky.

    I've visited the Balkans, know Serbia & Croatia well & it's history, I've also been across to the beautiful Emerald Isles & feel part of all three countries. I'm very lucky.

    I express honest, balanced views & have Schizophrenia Mr WTF.

    So I guess I'm real lucky, alive & kicking mate !

    Nothing further to add to your drunken rants - move along now please.

    ALAW

  10. #10
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